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Social Science

The study of Social Sciences is an integral part of the Appleby curriculum. In the early years, classes aim to develop an awareness of the wider community, an imaginative interest in the past and a respect for the relationship between people and their environments. Progressively, the student is introduced to Canadian heritage and geography, religion and spirituality, and a host of optional subjects. Students may choose from courses in geography, history and religion, as well as accounting, economics, philosophy and political science.

Students are taught increasingly sophisticated analytical and critical-thinking skills, with particular emphasis on integrating modern educational technologies and effective research methods into all levels of study. Social Sciences concern individuals and groups making choices in the context of evolving circumstances and ongoing environmental challenges. In this way, students become sympathetic to the complexities of human experience, both past and present. Programs place a particular emphasis on teaching an appreciation for each student’s role and responsibilities in Canadian life and the development of a strong global perspective.



 

Middle One Required

Social Science - HSC7J 
This course focuses on the development of Canada from the 17th to the early 19th century, with a geographic component allowing students to study geography as a separate discipline. Students study early North American settlements and the impact of the Aboriginal peoples on English/French relations. They examine the economic, social and political challenges faced in New France and British North America, as well as the course of conflict and change in the two colonies that culminated in the rebellions of 1837. Emphasis is placed on the development of critical-thinking skills, including the ability to examine issues from more than one point of view. They are introduced to the essential themes of geographic inquiry as well as to the tools and technologies used in the study of geography. They investigate the forces that contribute to patterns in the physical world and develop an awareness of the range of opportunities it provides to the people who interact with it. The study of natural resources focuses on the different ways people use resources and the environmental implications of their actions.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: None

 

Middle Two Required

Social Science - HSC8J 
This course blends a study of Canadian history from the 1850s to the end of World War One in 1918 with a study of global patterns and human geography. Students investigate the formation of the Canadian nation and its subsequent expansion. They also examine some of the individuals, groups and movements promoting political and social change in the early 20th-century. Students are challenged by activities which allow them to “experience” history. Students are given the opportunity to develop their analytic writing skills and participate in an essay contest which promotes the foundations of argument development, academic research, and critical thinking. The geography focus is on global population distribution, patterns in settlement, the major types of migration and factors affecting mobility. Students analyze land-use patterns and economic relationships. They study the manufacturing process and the distribution of products, and identify the interrelationships among the three types of industry.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: None

 

Upper One Required

Issues in Canadian Geography - CGC1D 
This course examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems and how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Students will explore environmental, economic, and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation options, energy choices, and urban development. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate various geographic issues and to develop possible approaches for making Canada a more sustainable place to live.  Geotechnologies are used throughout the course to extend student learning and to bring contemporary geographic topics to light. 

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: None

 

Upper Two Required

Canadian History Since World War I - CHC2D 
This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: None

 

Civics - CHV2O5 (online)
What does it mean to live in a democracy? What are our rights and responsibilities as democratic citizens in the contemporary world? How is our understanding of democracy different from that of other nations? This course examines these issues as they relate to what it means to be a responsible citizen. Students explore significant questions about public life, and how to be responsible and active in our society. The focus is on our local political world in Oakville, Southern Ontario and Canada, but comparisons are made with other regions and nations around the world. In a series of lectures, students gain background knowledge of the world of civic life, then explore the issues raised through active involvement in the Toskan Youth Philanthropic Initiative with a local grassroots non-profit organization. A number of required Appleby programs such as Chapel and the Northward Bound program further deal with the content of this course.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: None

 

World Religions and Beliefs Traditions - Perspectives, Issues and Challenges - HRT3M5 

This course provides students with opportunities to explore various world religions and belief traditions. Students will develop knowledge of the terms and concepts relevant to this area of study, will examine the ways in which religions and belief traditions meet various human needs, and will learn about the relationship between belief and action. They will examine sacred writings and teachings, consider how concepts of time and place influence different religions and belief traditions, and develop research and inquiry skills related to the study of human expressions of belief.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: None

 

Senior One Required

Students must select at least one of the following options.

World Issues: A Geographic Analysis - CGW4U 

This course looks at the global challenge of creating a more sustainable and equitable world. Students will explore a range of issues involving environmental, economic, social, and geopolitical interrelationships, and will examine governmental policies related to these issues. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate these complex issues, including their impact on natural and human communities around the world.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: HRT3M

 

Race, Gender and Rights - HSB4M 

This course is intended to offer students an intensive study of Race, Gender and Rights in Canada and the world. As citizens in a global community, students need to be aware of the ideologies that shape individual and social imagination. By looking at important cultural, political, and economic relationships and events in history, as well as those occurring now, students will gain a stronger understanding of the role of multiculturalism and diversity in society. This course will focus on the application theories through an in- depth examination of social issues such as social constructs of gender and race, stereotyping, heterosexism, and the rights of children throughout the world. The knowledge and skills students acquire in this course will be useful in a variety of careers. Students will be made aware of these possibilities and encouraged to explore areas of interest to them.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: HRT3M

 

Canadian Perspective of the United States: History, Identity, Culture AP - CHI4U AP Logo
This course traces the social, economic, and political development of the United States from colonial times to the present. Students will explore the historical context of key developments that shaped the United States, its identity and culture, and its role in the global community. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating forces in American history. With completion of additional preparation (including supplemental classes), students may choose to write the AP US History examination in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: HRT3M

 

The Environment and Resource Management - CGR4M 
This course explores interactions between the natural and human environment, with a particular focus on the impact of human activity on various ecosystems. Students will explore resource management and sustainability practices, as well as related government policy and international protocols. Applying the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, students will investigate the relationship between people and the natural environment and will propose approaches for developing more sustainable relationships, including environmentally responsible actions that support stewardship.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: HRT3M

 

Senior One Elective

Principals of Accounting - BAT3M
This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting, with emphasis on accounting procedures used in service and merchandising businesses. Students develop an understanding of the connections between financial analysis, control and decision making in the management of a business, as well as the effects of technology and globalization on accounting procedures, and the role of an accountant.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: None

 

International Service Co-op - CGW4U-C, HSB4M-C, CHI4U-C, CGR4M-C International Service Projects include construction, environmental and social development projects, at the same time as providing exposure to a new community and culture; students learn valuable skills for adaptation and meaningful contribution. Students completing an International Service Project in their Senior One year are able to combine the experience with one of the compulsory Senior One Social Science courses and complete a co-op credit. The International Service Co-op credit includes integration of an action research assignment connecting their international service project experience to their academic course work.

Evaluation: International Service Project Placement – 50%, Social Science Course Work – 25%, Academically Focused Assignment – 15%, Personal Reflection - 10%

Prerequisite: None

 

Senior Two Elective

World History: The West and the World AP - CHY4U AP Logo 
This course investigates the major trends in Western civilization and world history to the present. Students learn about the interaction between the emerging West and other regions of the world and about the development of modern social, political and economic systems. The skills and knowledge developed in this course enable students to understand and appreciate both the character of historical change and the historical roots of contemporary issues. Students have an opportunity to write an AP examination in World history, testing their knowledge and understanding of global processes and contacts. Students are prepared for this examination through the existing World History course, as well as through in-depth reading, comparing and analyzing diverse historical texts. Students will be advised whether or not to write the examination after their first reporting period on criteria such as strong achievement, solid analytical skills and keen interest. The AP examination takes place in May of each year.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Economics AP - CIA4U AP Logo 

This course examines current national and global economic trends and policies from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the impact of choices that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in responding to local, national, and global economic issues such as globalization and global economic inequalities, trade agreements, national debt, taxation, social spending, and consumer debt. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, including economic models, to investigate, and develop informed opinions about, current economic issues and to help them make reasoned economic decisions.

Students have the opportunity to write the Advanced Placement examination in Macroeconomics. Students are prepared for this examination through the existing 4U course, as well as through the use of specific texts, readings and workbooks focused on the AP examination material. An AP course is designed to give you a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops your familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

World Geography AP - CGU4U AP Logo 

With a Human Geography focus, this course explores global population distribution, why people live where they do and variations in their quality of life. Students will examine current population patterns and trends related to urbanization and development and consider their impact on human and natural systems. Reflecting on issues related to culture and globalization students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate issues related to political and industrial development on urban life and will examine the impact of globalization on populations throughout the world.  With departmental approval, students may elect to prepare for the AP Human Geography exam in this course. The AP examination takes place in May of each year.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Canadian and World Politics - CPW4U 

This course introduces students to the rich cultural legacy of the Classical world and encourages them to make connections between antiquity and other societies and to their own personal experiences. Students will investigate such aspects of Classical culture as its mythology and literature, art, architecture, philosophy, science, and technology, as well as elements of the ancient Greek and Latin languages. By reading Classical authors in English translation and examining material culture brought to light through archaeology, students will enhance both their communication skills and their ability to think critically and creatively. In addition, they will be encouraged to be culturally sensitive, independent learners who appreciate the interconnectedness of ancient and modern societies and who will be able to apply this understanding to their future endeavours.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Canadian and International Law - CLN4U 
This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law, constitutions, human rights law, criminal law, and the principles and practices of international law and will learn to relate them to issues in Canadian society and the wider world. Students will develop their understanding of law within the context of topics such as religion, security, cyberspace, immigration, crimes against humanity, and environmental protection. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal inquiry process and will develop legal reasoning skills and an understanding of conflict resolution in the area of international law. Students will apply their knowledge and skills in a number of simulations throughout the course.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Canadian and International Business Perspectives - BBB4M 
This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. In addition to the exploring the world of international business through case studies and contemporary examples of entrepreneurship offered in the curriculum, the course offers students an exclusive opportunity to become engaged as entrepreneurs in the international business market. With the skills and knowledge acquired in the course, students apply their skills as they work through a company incubation program which provides them with real entrepreneurial experience as they start and run a small business and engage in all levels of business operations.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Accounting - BAT4M 
This course emphasizes the study of accounting principles related to financial statements. Students learn about ways in which information in these statements is used in making business decisions. The focus of this course is on the financial statements and understanding the various components of the statements. Students learn different methods of inventory valuation and amortization and how to account for capital assets and prepare a Cash Flow Statement. Students also study various means of financing a business and ways in which the strength of a corporation can be determined through the reading of its annual report by using various methods of financial analysis.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: BAF3M

 

Human Growth and Development: Psychology AP - HHG4M AP Logo 
This course introduces students to the concepts, researchers, events and themes related to psychology, and the scientific research method. Students utilize contemporary dialogue about human behaviour, including societal and cross-cultural perspectives. Students will gain a broad understanding of the biosocial aspects of human behaviour and development, through studies of how the brain functions and affects our cognition, sensation and perception, memory, thinking and intelligence. Students will be exposed to social psychology, including development through the lifespan, and the acquisition of language. Personality and emotional states are also focused upon, culminating with disorders, therapies, and the function of stress. Throughout, individual, group, and creative activities, including student led experiments will punctuate each of the four units of the course.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Classical Civilizations - LVV4U 

This course introduces students to the rich cultural legacy of the Classical world and encourages them to make connections between antiquity and other societies and to their own personal experiences. Students will investigate such aspects of Classical culture as its mythology and literature, art, architecture, philosophy, science, and technology, as well as elements of the ancient Greek and Latin languages. By reading Classical authors in English translation and examining material culture brought to light through archaeology, students will enhance both their communication skills and their ability to think critically and creatively. In addition, they will be encouraged to be culturally sensitive, independent learners who appreciate the interconnectedness of ancient and modern societies and who will be able to apply this understanding to their future endeavours.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 %    Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Philosophy: Questions and Theories - HZT4U
This course addresses three (or more) of the central areas of philosophy: metaphysics, logic, epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students learn critical-thinking skills, the key ideas expressed by philosophers from a variety of the world’s traditions, how to develop and explain their own philosophical ideas, and how to apply those ideas to contemporary social issues and personal experiences. The course also helps students refine skills used in researching and investigating topics in philosophy.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Prerequisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

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