Course Calendar

Academic Program

Academic Program

Academic Program

Academic Program

Appleby College believes in the importance and value of completing a secondary education. Our school philosophy includes a commitment to reach every student to help him or her achieve a successful outcome from their school experience at Appleby. The concept of completing a secondary education is essential. Obtaining a high school diploma has become an increasingly important prerequisite for economic and social mobility in the world. Young people with a high school education are much better equipped for the modern life. They are more likely to be permanently employed and/or to be admitted to post-secondary institutions to further their education and become active members of our society. In Ontario, students are required to remain in secondary school until the student has reached the age of eighteen or obtained an Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

Our Mission

To educate and enable young men and women to become leaders of character, major contributors to, and valued representatives of their local, national and international communities.

Our Vision

To develop intellectual curiosity, instil a love of learning and promote personal excellence in all areas of endeavour. To provide access to outstanding experiences, facilities, faculty and staff. To be an internationally recognized model of educational excellence and innovation.

Curriculum Principles

Appleby offers a distinguished curriculum. A diverse range of required components provides students with stimulating challenges and the opportunity to acquire knowledge, skills and values. The achievement: preparation for university and life. The defining characteristic of an Appleby education is the mandatory participation in each of its core curricular components, leading to an Appleby Diploma upon graduation.

Appleby develops young men and women of personal integrity, who are prepared for university, societal change, responsible involvement and leadership in their local, national and global communities.

The curriculum focuses on: 

  • critical-thinking skills 
  • individual potential 
  • self-discipline, respect, responsibility and commitment 
  • spiritual and moral development 
  • democratic principles 
  • personal fitness and health 
  • environmental awareness and stewardship 
  • the role of gender, ethnicity, race and culture in building rich, diverse communities 
  • student-centred experiences which create leadership opportunities

Our secondary school credit courses are based on Ontario Ministry of Education course curriculum. At Appleby the school year is divided into three reporting periods and courses predominantly run for the full year. There are four report cards with a mid-term report halfway through the first reporting period and the other three coming at the end of each reporting period. The school day is broken down into one hour classes beginning at 8:00 a.m. and ending at either 2:45 p.m. or 3:50 p.m. depending on the five day schedule rotation.

Appleby College offers a comprehensive program with a wide array of course offerings. To qualify for an Appleby Diploma, students complete courses extending beyond the requirements of  the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Appleby graduates complete a four-year liberal arts secondary school program.

Starting in Middle School, students move ahead in traditional coursework; the correlation between grade identification and course codes at Appleby reflects the fact that traditional pairing is no longer appropriate. For example, Grade 8 students take some courses normally associated with Grade 9 (1D); Grade 9 equivalent students take both Grade 9 and Grade 10 courses (1D, 1O and 2D); and Senior One students take courses at both Grade 11 and 12 levels.

To accommodate this situation and to provide nomenclature which reflects the organization of the school into pairs of grades, Appleby uses the following designations for the traditional age groups or grades:

Middle School

Middle One (M1) Grade 7
Middle Two (M2) Grade 8

Upper School

Upper One (U1) Grade 9
Upper Two (U2) Grade 10

Senior School

Senior One (S1) Grade 11
Senior Two (S2) Grade 12

Each of the Middle, Upper and Senior Schools has a director who monitors the academic progress and general well-being of the students.

Curriculum

Curriculum

How to gain access to Outlines of the Courses of Study - Course outlines for all courses are kept on file at the school and are available to parents and students. The courses offered by this school have been developed according to the requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education.

How to gain access to Ontario curriculum policy documents - Every two years, the Ontario Ministry of Education visits Appleby College to assess the school’s compliance with Ministry of Education policies and to confirm authority to grant credits towards the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. To access the Ministry website, visit http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng.

Courses are offered each year, subject to sufficient enrolment, unless otherwise indicated. If a course is oversubscribed, some students cannot obtain first choices. Scheduling conflicts may preclude certain combinations of subjects.

Academic Credits - All courses listed with a course code are worth credits towards the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). See OSSD requirements for further information.

Transfers - Course transfers must be completed prior to Thanksgiving weekend. Parental permission is required. It is important that students make every effort to choose their programs wisely during the course selection procedure.

Course Withdrawals - Students carrying more courses than the minimum school requirement may withdraw from an elective course up until the end of March of each academic year. For the 2018-19 school year the course withdrawal deadline is March 29, 2019. Courses dropped after the deadline by students in grades 11 and 12 are registered on the student's Ontario Student Transcript showing the grade at time of withdrawal.

Prerequisites - Some courses require students to have passed the course at a lower level or to have suitable equivalent experience. In addition, Appleby College also has specific requirements for some courses. A prerequisite required by the Ministry of Education is noted as "Prerequisite". Courses required by Appleby are noted as "Appleby Prerequisite". If a student enters Appleby and wishes to take a course without the required pre-requisite, the Principal or Head of School may decide to place the student appropriately following an oral and written evaluation. Students will not be approved to miss courses required in the Appleby curriculum.

Courses in Grades 11 and 12 may have prerequisites as a requirement for enrolment.  All prerequisite courses will be identified in ministry curriculum policy documents,  and no courses apart from these may be identified as prerequisites. Schools must  provide parents and students with clear and accurate information on prerequisites. If a parent or an adult student requests that a prerequisite be waived, the Principal or Head of School will determine whether or not the prerequisite should be waived. A Principal or Head of School may also initiate consideration of whether a prerequisite should be waived. The Principal or Head of School will make his or her decision in consultation with the parent or adult student and appropriate school staff. In cases where the parent or adult student disagrees with the decision of the Principal or Head of School, the parent or adult student may ask the appropriate supervisory officer to  review the matter.

Substitutions for Compulsory Courses - To allow for flexibility in designing a student's program and to ensure all students can qualify for the OSSD, substitutions may be made for a limited number of compulsory credits. With permission, students may replace up to three credits (or the equivalent in half-credits) with courses selected from the remaining courses offered by the school that meet the requirements for compulsory credits. In all cases, the sum of compulsory and optional credits will not be fewer than 30 to earn the OSSD. Substitutions should only be made to promote and enhance student learning, or to meet special needs and interests. Each substitution will be noted on the student's Ontario Student Transcript.

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) - Students who have appropriate knowledge and skills may receive credit for these in one of two ways: 1. A student may "challenge" for a credit through an evaluation process which verifies the student has required knowledge and skills as outlined in an Ontario provincial curriculum document. The PLAR procedures are carried out under the direction of the Principal or Head of School, who grants the credits. A maximum of four credits may be granted through the challenge process for Grade 10, 11 and 12 courses with no more than two in any one subject area. 2. Students educated outside Ontario may be granted equivalency credits for coursework they have completed. Equivalencies are granted for placement purposes only.

Experiential Learning Programs Cooperative Education - Cooperative education programs allow students to earn secondary school credits while completing a work placement in the community. These programs complement students’ academic programs and are valuable for all students, whatever their postsecondary destination.  A cooperative education program comprises, at a minimum, one cooperative education course and its related course, on which the cooperative education course is based. Any course from an Ontario curriculum policy document or any ministry-approved locally developed course may serve as the related course for a cooperative education program.

Work Experience - Work experience is a component of a course that provides students with a learning opportunity in the workplace for a limited period of time – from one to four weeks. Some requirements for work experience mirror those for cooperative education programs.

Job Shadowing and Job Twinning - Job shadowing and job twinning may be offered to students from Grade 7 to Grade 12 as part of curriculum delivery or as part of the guidance and career education program. Job shadowing allows a student to spend one-half to one day (or, in some cases, up to three days) observing a worker in a specific occupation. Job twinning provides the opportunity for the student to observe a cooperative education student at his or her placement for one-half to one day.

Ontario Student Record - An Ontario Student Record (OSR) is established for each student enrolled in a Ministry-inspected Ontario school. The OSR is an ongoing record and is transferred between schools attended. The OSR contains biographical information about the student, a listing of schools attended, parent and guardian information, the Ontario Student Transcript, final report cards, a record of second language instruction and any other special records of standardized testing, identifications or placement determinations, and health or psychological reports. Parents or students can review the contents of the OSR by contacting Guidance. Each student and the parent(s) or guardian(s) of a student who is not an adult is entitled to have access to the student's OSR.

Ontario Student Transcript - The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is a component of the OSR. It is the official record of a student's successful completion of Ontario Secondary School credits. The OST records the results of all secondary school courses, including failures, repeated courses and Grade 11 or 12 courses from which a student withdraws following January 15 of the academic year. Students wishing to move between courses at different levels are required to meet the prerequisite requirements.

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Requirement - All students must successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Requirement in order to earn a secondary school diploma. The Ontario School Literacy Test is normally written in the Grade 10 year and is based on the Ontario curriculum expectations for language and communication, particularly reading and writing, up to and including Grade 9. Students who do not successfully complete the test after taking it twice, may take the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) which is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test. Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation. Successful completion of the test (or the OSSLC) is recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript.   

Literacy Test Accommodations - Accommodations will be made to ensure students with documented special needs have a fair and equal opportunity to successfully complete the literacy test. While accommodations such as alternative forms of print and extra time are acceptable, the actual content of the secondary school literacy test must not be altered.    

Literacy Test Deferrals - Students who might benefit from a deferral of the test may include students who have not yet acquired the level of proficiency in English required for successfully completing the test. If a parent requests a deferral, the School will determine whether or not a deferral should be granted and, if so, for what period of time. The School may also initiate consideration of a deferral in consultation with the parent. 

Independent/Private Study - Teachers may allow for independent study in any given course. While Appleby does not offer entire courses of independent study, senior-level courses may have independent study components. In situations where Appleby does not offer a course, permission may be granted to work through the Ontario Independent Learning Centre. Appleby does not provide the opportunity for private study courses.

Online Learning - Students complete a variety of online learning modules in various subject areas at Appleby. Information on online learning modules and hours can be found in the academic course of study for each course. Upper Two students take the compulsory half-credit in Civics online. Students in grade 12 may elect to take one of their required 6 course-load online from an accredited outside provider. Students in grade 9-12 may not substitute any of their required per-year course load with an online course. They may take courses online above the required minimum load taken at Appleby. Students taking an online course need the permission of the Guidance department.

Guidance Resource Centre - The Guidance Resource Centre, located in the Beasley Guidance Centre, contains current literature and computer software including educational, career and personal lifestyle information. Literature from Canadian, American and UK universities makes up a significant portion of the holdings. In Guidance classes, students are shown how to locate and assimilate information using print, video and computer databases. Parents are also encouraged to use the resources.

Students with Accommodations - Students with Accommodations will be identified through Guidance and teachers will receive an educational plan, or “Student Success Profile” for these students which often includes teaching guidelines, assessment practices and classroom management ideas. It is a requirement for each teacher to review and employ the plan and guidelines for each student with accommodations they teach, as they are individualized and will enhance educational success.

Appleby College is dedicated to providing supports and accommodations to students who have received a medical diagnosis related to their learning exceptionalities and or mental health and wellness. The focal point of these supports is the school’s Student Success Center (SSC) which provides the necessary supports for those students to have access to official accommodations. A student who uses these supports may include: those with a Learning Difference (LD) in Reading, Writing or Mathematics, Attention Deficient Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Stress and Anxiety, Executive Functioning, English Language Learners (ELL) and other Medical conditions.

Transition Student Policies - The following policy is intended to support English language learners at Appleby College. Potential transition students are flagged at the time of admission into the school by the Director of Guidance. Students admitted to the school from non-English speaking countries and who have not attended an all-English speaking school during the year prior to attending Appleby may qualify. Other students may qualify under exceptional circumstances to be determined in consultation with the Director of Guidance and the Academic Student support team. Students in the graduating class are not eligible for transition status. Other English Language Learning (ELL) supports are available at the school to assist all students.

Academic Program Requirements for Transition students - All U1-U2 transition students are required to take a language course through the end of their U2 year. The course selection will be made according to previous language background of the student and with approval from the Guidance and Language Departments.

Cultural Transition Approaches - Students may face a cultural transition when arriving at Appleby College and as a result additional supports may need to be developed to ease their transition to life in a North American boarding school. Students identified as requiring this additional support will have a plan developed through consultation with Guidance and the appropriate Residential Faculty and School Directors. Any cultural transition support will last for 6 months.

Academic Support - Students struggling with organization issues and/or academic difficulties should be promptly directed by their teacher first to the student’s advisor. If problems persist, the student should be referred to the Guidance office for further learning skills counselling and support.

If a student is struggling academically with a particular subject, then the following protocol must be followed:

  1. The course teacher asks the student to attend departmentally-run extra-help sessions. Students may also be asked to make use of other academic assistance such as the Online Writing Lab or Peer Tutoring. Any requests for Peer Tutoring should be directed to the Academic Prefect.
  2. The teacher will complete a request for tutoring form and return it to Jenny Casey in the Guidance Department. The student will then be referred to an external tutor in collaboration with the student’s parents and the school.

Evaluation, Reporting and Promotion

Evaluation, Reporting and Promotion

Evaluation - At Appleby, evaluation takes many forms; it is formal and informal, written and oral. It assesses the progress that students have made in their acquisition of skills and mastery of concepts for each unit of work. It tells teachers how effective their teaching has been and what changes should be made in methods and content. It tells parents how their child is progressing, and tells students what they have learned and need to learn. There is a system of formal examinations written twice a year. As well, Appleby College recognizes the value of students completing summative evaluations that can assess important ways of learning, such as oral communication, presentation skills, research and practical applications of theoretical material. In many classes, these summative evaluations will be implemented along with exams, so that teachers assess not only learning from knowledge, but also from deeper inquiry that involves the exchange and application of ideas and a cumulative perspective of much of the knowledge and skills that students have learned over an extended period of time. 
The weighting of examinations is as follows:

  • June examinations are incorporated in the final summative mark (30%). Students are evaluated using a combination of term work, tests and examinations. The mark weighting for the components used for assessment is noted in each course description as follows: Evaluation: Term Work - 70%      Summative Evaluation - 30%

Reporting- Formal reports are written three times a year (November, March and June). Reports indicate the strengths and weaknesses of the student and may give some suggestions for improving performance. Teachers are available to discuss these reports or any issues that may arise during the year. The information is of two kinds:

  • Statistical: A student's marks relative to the course median are noted.
  • Anecdotal: Anecdotal reports are written by teachers, co-curricular leaders, residential life staff and school directors.

Optimates - Students achieving an overall average of 85% or above for the year (a combination of term and summative assessment) are recognized in the following year as Optimates students. These students are recognized by the Head of School at a dinner in their honour. The student average is calculated including the required course for each grade and only those courses taken at Appleby during the September to June academic year. Summer school or online courses are not used to calculate or adjust the average used for Optimates calculation. Students must meet all the academic requirements in terms of courses, as well as meet the other curriculum expectations for the year to be eligible for Optimates.

Promotion

Appleby College Promotion Policy - In order to be promoted to the next grade level, a student must achieve an overall average of 70%, including a minimum of 60% in all prerequisites for required courses, including English, and a minimum of 50% in all other courses. In addition, students must complete the co-curricular requirements for athletics, arts and service. Successful and appropriate completion of all scheduled trips and visits, including those to Mclaughlin Northern Campus, is also required.

Student Citizenship - If a student fails to meet behavioural expectations or make a positive contribution to the life of the school, that individual may not be permitted to return the following year.

Community Involvement Activities - As stated in Ontario Secondary Schools, Grades 9 to 12: Program and Diploma Requirements, 1999 (OSS), every student who begins secondary school during or after the 1999–2000 school year must complete a minimum of 40 hours of community involvement activities as part of the requirements for an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). As part of the Appleby diploma requirements, Upper and Senior school students must complete a minimum of 25 hours of community involvement activities per year. A summary of recorded service hours appears on the report card each year.

The purpose of the community involvement requirement is to encourage students to develop awareness and understanding of civic responsibility and of the role they can play and the contributions they can make in supporting and strengthening their communities.

Community involvement activities are part of the school's program.

Procedures for Students

Students may complete the 40 hours of community involvement activities at any time during their secondary school program. They may also complete any number of activities, as long as those activities result in the completion of 40 hours of community involvement. Students under the age of eighteen years will plan and select their community involvement activities in consultation with their parents.

Before beginning any community involvement activity, each student must complete and submit a “Notification of Planned Community Involvement Activities” form. The student will select an activity (or activities) from the board's list of approved activities, or an activity that is not on the list, provided that it is not an activity that is on the ministry's or board's list of ineligible activities (see “Ineligible Activities” below). If the activity is not on the board's list of approved activities, the student will have to obtain written approval from the principal (that is, the principal's signature beside the activity described on the notification form). A student under the age of eighteen must complete the form in consultation with his or her parents, and must also have one parent sign the form. The student will sign the form and submit it to the principal or to another school contact designated by the principal (for example, the student's teacher-adviser). More than one such form may be submitted when additional activities are planned that were not included on a previously submitted form.

When the activity is completed, the student must fill out the “Completion of Community Involvement Activities” form. The sponsor of the activity – that is, the person or organization that provided the community involvement activity – will complete the appropriate sections of the form to verify that the activity has been completed, and will sign the form. The form must also be signed by one of the student's parents if the student is under eighteen years of age. The student must submit the form to the principal or other school contact upon completion of the 40 hours, or at appropriate intervals determined by the principal.

Students will provide their parents with a copy of the board's document “Information on the Community Involvement Diploma Requirement”, which they will be given by the school. Students will also give a copy of this document to the sponsor of the community involvement activity.

Ineligible Activities

The ministry has developed a list of activities that may not be chosen as community involvement activities. These are referred to as ineligible activities. An ineligible activity is an activity that:

  • is a requirement of a class or course in which the student is enrolled (e.g., cooperative education portion of a course, job shadowing, work experience);
  • takes place during the time allotted for the instructional program on a school day. However, an activity that takes place during the student's lunch breaks or “spare” periods is permissible;
  • takes place in a logging or mining environment, if the student is under sixteen years of age;
  • takes place in a factory, if the student is under fifteen years of age;
  • takes place in a workplace other than a factory, if the student is under fourteen years of age and is not accompanied by an adult;
  • would normally be performed for wages by a person in the workplace;
  • involves the operation of a vehicle, power tools, or scaffolding;
  • involves the administration of any type or form of medication or medical procedure to other persons;
  • involves handling of substances classed as “designated substances” under the Occupational Health and Safety Act;
  • requires the knowledge of a tradesperson whose trade is regulated by the provincial government;
  • involves banking or the handling of securities, or the handling of jewellery, works of art, antiques, or other valuables;
  • consists of duties normally performed in the home (i.e., daily chores) or personal recreational activities;
  • involves activities for a court-ordered program (e.g., community-service program for young offenders, probationary program).

Promotion Committee - The case of any individual not meeting these prescribed conditions will be considered at the year's end by the Promotion Committee. The student may be required to make up the deficiency through a recognized summer program, to repeat the year or to withdraw. To be considered a graduate of Appleby, a student must meet the requirements of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. To be awarded an Appleby College Diploma, a student must achieve a minimum overall average of 70% in six Grade 12 courses including English. All core English courses (ENG1D-4U) must be taken at Appleby in the Harkness model, during the regular school year. In the final year at Appleby, a student must maintain a 70% overall average, successfully complete a minimum of six Grade 12 courses and meet the requirements of the school's co-curricular, service and residential life programs.

Graduation and Diploma Requirements

Graduation and Diploma Requirements

Appleby College offers three diplomas:

Ontario Secondary School Diploma

The basic diploma (OSSD) is that for the Ontario Secondary School system, as approved by the Ontario Ministry of Education. In addition, Appleby offers its own diploma, for which the requirements are more rigorous.

To get your OSSD you need:     

  • 18 compulsory credits    
  • 12 optional credits    
  • 40 hours of community involvement activities
  • The provincial secondary school literacy requirement     

i) Secondary School Literacy Graduation Requirement

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test 
All students must successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) in order to earn a secondary school diploma. This test is written in the Grade 10 year and is based on the Ontario curriculum expectations for language and communication, particular reading and writing, up to and including Grade 9. If students do not complete the test successfully, Appleby College will provide remedial assistance to help improve skills so that students are better prepared to retake the literacy test. Successful completion of the test is recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript. Accommodations will be available as specified in a student’s learning profile.

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course 
Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course. Arrangements may be made on an as needed basis for students who have not been successful on the OSSLT to take this course for the purposes of meeting the literacy requirement for graduation.

ii) Substitutions for Compulsory Courses 
To allow for flexibility in designing a student's program and to ensure all students can qualify for the OSSD, substitutions may be made for a limited number of compulsory credits. With permission, students may replace up to three credits (or the equivalent in half-credits) with courses selected from the remaining courses offered by the school that meet the requirements for compulsory credits. In all cases, the sum of compulsory and optional credits will not be fewer than 30 to earn the OSSD. Substitutions should only be made to promote and enhance student learning, or to meet special needs and interests. Each substitution will be noted on the student's Ontario Student Transcript.

Appleby College Diploma

All students work towards the Appleby College Diploma. This diploma, which is awarded to graduates at the end of the Senior Two year, signifies that the student has not only met the academic requirements of the school, but has also met the requirements of the co-curricular, service and residential life programs. By meeting the academic requirements for the Appleby College Diploma, students also satisfy the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, including at least seven Grade 12 credits, four of which must be at the U level.        

Students are required to participate in the Northward Bound programs in both Upper One and Upper Two to the school's McLaughlin Northern Campus. Students will also be required to complete the Bronze Duke of Edinburgh's Award as part of their Appleby Diploma requirements. Students will need 25 hours of community involvement each year.

Global Leadership Diploma

During a student’s time at Appleby College, they are exposed to a rich variety of developmental experiences which serve to prepare our students for futures in which they will be valued leaders and contributors to global communities. The Global Leadership Diploma is designed to enrich the Appleby experience, to guide students who see the relevance and importance of understanding the world in which they live, and how that world is connected in a myriad of ways with all who share it. Combining outdoor education, service learning, intercultural experience and academic pursuit ensures an experientially-based program which not only develops understanding, but also exposure and practice of relevant skills. The Global Leadership Diploma also serves to recognize the significant body of experiences that students complete while at Appleby College which work together with their academic study to ensure graduation of globally responsible and engaged contributors and leaders. Global Scholars really examine and consider the world around them, their individual role in that world, and their responsibility to it.

Ontario Secondary School Diploma

Compulsory Credits - (Total of 18)
4 credits in English (1 credit per grade)
1 credit in French as a second language
3 credits in Mathematics (at least 1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)
2 credits in Science
1 credit in Canadian History
1 credit in Canadian Geography
1 credit in the Arts
1 credit in Health and Physical Education
1 credit in Civics and Career Studies 
(0.5 in Civics and 0.5 in Career Studies)
  
Plus:
1 additional credit selected from English or a third language or a Social Science or Canadian and World Studies
1 additional credit selected from Health and Physical Education or Business Studies or the Arts (Music, Art, Drama or Dance)
1 additional credit selected from Science (Grade 11 or 12) or Technological Education (Grades 9 to 12)

Elective Credits - (Total of 12)
Any 12 additional credits may be taken to complete the student's program. A credit is granted on the successful completion of a course that has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours.
  
Service - A minimum of 40 hours of community involvement is required in order to qualify for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

Appleby Diploma

Compulsory Credits - (Total of 19.5)
   
English
ENG1D, 2D, 3U and 4U must all be taken at Appleby during the regular school year.

Languages
French until Upper Two (at least two credits in French), and one additional credit in a third language (German, Spanish or Mandarin).
  
Arts
Upper One required Arts credit.
  
Physical and Health Education
One credit is required, as well as the Northward Bound Program in Upper One and Upper Two.
  
Science and Mathematics
Science and Mathematics taken until Senior One (at least three credits in each subject).
  
Social Science
Civics half-credit and World Religions half-credit in Upper Two, plus a Senior One Social Science credit.
  
Guidance
Half-credit in Guidance: Career Studies.
  
Technology
Computer competencies met each year through e.school@appleby™.

Elective Credits - (Total of nine to 12)
Students can choose nine to 12 additional credits to complete their academic requirements.
  
Residential Life Requirement
Senior Two students are required to board on campus and participate in Appleby's Residential Life Programme and corresponding curriculum.

Service
Upper and Senior students must complete a minimum of 25 service hours each year (100 hours over four years).
  
Co-curricular Activities
Participation in arts, athletics and service activities is a compulsory component of the Appleby Diploma.
  
Duke of Edinburgh Bronze Award
Students are required to complete the Bronze award of the Duke of Edinburgh program. They are strongly encouraged to complete the Silver and Gold requirements as well.

Global Experiential Trip
At some point between Upper One to Senior Two, students must participate in a Global Experiential Trip of approximately two weeks in length.

S2 Course Load
The typical S2 course load is 6 grade 12 credits with a maximum of 1 credit online, with approval, completed during the S2 academic year. A S2 student may be able to take a reduced course load of 5 credit courses, with the approval of the Director, Guidance and University Counselling, if all of the following apply: Prior to August 31 of the S2 school year, 25 Ontario Secondary School credits have been completed, including compulsory courses for both the Ontario and Appleby College Diplomas; Prior to August 31 of the S2 school year, two grade 12 credits (4U or 4M) must be completed with a final grade of at least 85%; The reduced course load must include the "Required" ENG4U course and exclude any external online courses.

 

Global Leadership Diploma

In addition to the Appleby Diploma requirements
  
Academic

o   Interdisciplinary Studies: Global Leadership course completed in S2

o   1 international language to the 4U/DU level

o   completion of Global Leadership Literary Assignment as part of ENG4U.

o   2 other Senior Two courses with explicit Global Scholars Assignment, linking the course curriculum to a tangible global connection.

International Service Project with International Service Co-op Credit

Students are required to complete an International Service Project in their Senior One year, combining the experience with their Senior Social Science course through the completion of a co-op credit. The co-op credit includes Social Science action/research assignment, creative journal assignment and self-reflection.

Adventure-based Experiences

o   Upper One ASCENT canoe expedition.

o   Upper Two Northward Bound winter expedition.

o   Duke of Edinburgh Award – completion of the Gold Award level.

Duke of Edinburgh Silver Award

Students are expected to complete a higher level of the Duke of Edinburgh Award, beyond the Bronze level to at least the Silver level. The Gold level is strongly recommended.

Intercultural Residential Experiences

o   International intercultural immersion program combining study of the local environment and culture.

Global Co-curricular Activities

At least 2 Clubs/Co-curriculars showing breadth of experience in  intercultural/global education (Global Education designation in Co-curricular/Club table).

Global Action Plan

o   Explanation of effect of Global Education experiences and knowledge gained.

o   Proposal addressing a global issue for further exploration beyond graduation.

o   Presentation of the Global Action Plan to a panel at the end of S2.

 

Additional information

The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) 
The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) will be granted, on request, to students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. To be granted an OSSC, a student must have earned a minimum of 14 credits, both compulsory and optional. For more information, refer to the document Ontario Schools, Kindergarten to Grade 12: Policy and Program Requirements.

The Certificate of Accomplishment 
Students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. The Certificate of Accomplishment may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain kinds of further training, or who plan to find employment directly after leaving school. For more information, refer to the document Ontario Schools, Kindergarten to Grade 12: Policy and Program Requirements.

Middle, Upper and Senior School Advantages

The Middle School Advantage

The Middle School program prepares Grade 7 and 8 students for the rigours of the Appleby program. Students are introduced to Appleby's academic program, e.school and co-curricular activities, along with a host of social, leadership and team-building activities in a supportive, nurturing environment.

The Home Form

Home Forms are an essential component of the Middle School program. Small class sizes are key, with courses taught by subject specialists. Students take about half of their courses each day with their Home Form class, building a sense of spirit and camaraderie among classmates. Other subjects allow them to mix with peers from other Forms, building a wide circle of friends. Students meet with their Form Advisors at the end of the day, four days a week, allowing them the opportunity to help manage homework assignments, discuss problems and celebrate successes. Form Advisors assist students with their transition to Appleby life and communicate on a regular basis with parents, providing a valuable bridge between school and home life. Students in each home form also have the opportunity to interact and be mentored by Senior One students, giving them a connection to other constituents of the school.

Academics

Middle Two students are offered the opportunity to take accelerated Grade 9 programs in Mathematics and French. Middle School students are also exposed to four international languages (German, Mandarin, Arabic and Spanish) in addition to the required French program. Science students work in specialized labs, performing experiments and learning the basics of the scientific method. Students are exposed to the arts, both music and visual arts, and enjoy a Comprehensive Arts course, which introduces them to drama, dance, and leadership training. Music students can choose between band, strings and vocal music. Organized Homework Blocks and Testing Blocks keep the workload manageable, and are available on e.school for both students and parents to keep track of and monitor over the course of the year.

Technology and the e.school@appleby Program

Appleby students are introduced to computers as a valuable tool to organize their school work, create reports, evaluate and present information. Computer competencies are taught throughout the school so by the time students enter Upper School they can create Web pages, are proficient in Microsoft Word, OneNote and PowerPoint, and can use some of the advanced functions of Microsoft Excel, such as charts and graphs.

Co-curricular Program

Middle School students have many opportunities to participate in school life. They play on the teams of their choice, representing the school at tournaments and inter-school competitions. They have opportunities to join Upper and Senior School students, participating in arts activities such as the School Play and Choir, and other activities. Middle One Students must also earn 10 service hours, while Middle Two students must earn 12 service hours. The school provides opportunities for service both on and off-campus. Through service activities, students learn the value of helping others, a key value of an Appleby education. Along with their grade trips and the various service opportunities, all Middle School students strive to achieve the requirements of the Young Duke of Edinburgh Award designed by Appleby College.

Leadership and Mentoring

Middle School students participate in the full life of the school through their involvement in activities such as Middle School Council, Middle School Service Council, Model United Nations, Choir, Student Ambassadors and Athletics. They learn from their older peers, and lead the way on their own terms in activities that are educational and fun. Various leadership opportunities are provided to Middle School students in their classes, the ALC (arts, creativity and leadership) comprehensive arts course, co-curricular activities, clubs, and Home Forms. Furthermore, special workshops and local and international conferences and trips are offered to help develop students' leadership skills.

Social Activities and School Trips

It's not all about school work. Middle School dances, class trips, class parties and activities, such as the Middle School Chapel service and monthly Nightingale competitions provide opportunities for interaction outside the classroom. School trips at each grade level, while academic in nature, also provide opportunities to build friendships and memories for a lifetime.

THE Upper SCHOOL ADVANTAGE

Rich Curriculum

Upper School offers exposure to a wide range of academic courses and co-curricular experiences so that students may discover their interests. Some choice is available, but all students must take a full course load of 8 courses in U1, and 8.5 courses in U2.

Supplementary curriculum is offered through the advisor program, chapel and grade band assemblies, with a focus on character education. Here, opportunities are plentiful for skill-building and cultivating awareness as we explore individually and in groups the concepts of leadership, integrity, confidence, and teamwork.

Experiential Education and Innovative Assessment

The Upper One summative program is ASCENT, which stands for Arts, Service, Cumulative Evaluation, and North Bound Trip. Drawing on the latest in educational research, it replaces traditional examinations and runs for the last two weeks of the school year in June. Here students are treated to authentic assessment experiences, which are often integrated with other subjects. The North Bound component, a 7 day canoe trip to Appleby's McLaughlin Northern Campus on Rabbitnose Island in Temagami, will begin in the Autumn, but continue to be an essential growth opportunity for the class, and lead towards their Duke of Edinburgh Bronze qualification.

Upper Two returns to Temagami in February each year to complete for a winter camping adventure and survival skills training. This program offers glimpses into leadership opportunities as students are led by Senior One peers.

Leadership

Leadership skill-building in the Upper School focuses on character, communication, organization, personal responsibility, and teamwork. These topics are an integral part of the curriculum at this level and are addressed through academic content and themes. Additionally, they form the backbone of co-curricular programming too, such as ASCENT, Northward Bound, Residential Life, Advisory, Grade Band Assemblies, Chapel week and various student-led events.

THE Senior SCHOOL ADVANTAGE

Boarding Program

Appleby's Boarding Program presents students with the opportunity to enhance important capacities and skills such as integrity, communication, dependability, adaptability, understanding differences, and conflict resolution. Boarders engage in a real life curriculum whereby students gain an appreciation for time and place through managing their study schedule and planning their time. For the grade twelve class, which must board, the Boarding Program provides the unique opportunity for each individual student to develop confidence and resilience in preparation for living away from home at university, and at the same time enables the class to broaden and deepen friendships and bond as a group.

Advanced Placement (AP) Courses 

Advanced Placement (AP) courses are a series of college-level courses and examinations designed for secondary school students. The examinations are administered by the U.S.-based College Board (the same organization that administers the SATs). AP courses provide the opportunity for students to increase the challenge of their studies, extending to content covered at the university level.

Appleby College offers 25 AP courses marked in the Course Descriptions by (AP) or with the AP symbol. With few exceptions, the courses are traditional Appleby courses with additional readings and assignments designed to prepare students for the AP examinations, which take place annually in May. Students will be advised whether or not to write the examination after their first reporting period based on criteria such as strong term achievement, solid analytical skills and keen interest in the program. Advantages of the AP Program:

  • Challenges students
  • Accelerates learning
  • Motivates students to improve study habits
  • Indicates to universities and colleges the high academic level of the student's secondary school
  • AP examinations are accepted as first-year credits at most Canadian universities, and most U.S. colleges and universities, and allows for placement in advanced-level courses
  • High scores on AP examinations are a strong indicator of future success in university and college courses

A tax receipt is issued to students who write the exam. The cost to write the tests is roughly comparable to the cost of the SATs. Students interested in learning more about AP examinations should speak to the Coordinator, External Academic Programs.

Leadership

Leadership skills that have been developed in previous years are further fostered and encouraged. Through on and off campus workshops, students are encouraged to discover individual leadership styles and to further develop this individually. The various components of the Senior School students academic, co-curricular and residential life program allow both Senior One and Senior Twos to consolidate and apply their leadership skills.

AP and Additional Awards

Advanced Placement Awards and Diplomas

AP Scholar Awards

The AP Scholar Awards recognize high school students who have demonstrated exemplary college-level achievement on AP Exams. A roster of award recipients is provided online to their secondary schools and districts. Additionally, students are able to print a copy of their award certificate(s) online, and the awards are reflected on all score reports sent to colleges after awards are conferred.

Award Levels

AP Scholar - Granted to students who receive scores of 3 or higher on three or more AP Exams.

AP Scholar with Honour - Granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.25 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams.

AP Scholar with Distinction - Granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on five or more of these exams.

National AP Scholar - Granted to students in Canada who receive an average score of at least 4 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 4 or higher on five or more of these exams.

AP International Diploma - Awarded to students who display exceptional achievement across a variety of disciplines.

AP Capstone Awards

AP Capstone is an innovative diploma program that equips students with the independent research, collaborative teamwork, and communication skills that are increasingly valued by colleges. AP Capstone students who have demonstrated outstanding college-level achievement in AP Seminar, AP Research, and additional AP courses are recognized through two awards:

AP Seminar and Research Certificate - Granted to students who earn scores of 3 or higher in both AP Seminar and AP Research.

AP Capstone Diploma - Granted to students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research and on four additional AP Exams of their choosing.

Additional Certifications and Qualifications

Today, more than ever, there is tough competition for university entrance. Strong academic, co-curricular, guidance and leadership programs give Appleby students an advantage over many others. In addition to these programs, Appleby offers a number of special certificates and programs which support the interests of the students. Information on how to attain these certificates and diplomas is available from the Coordinator, External Academic Programs.

Diploma of European Proficiency

Through Appleby's membership in the Belgian-based UCAPE (Union for Cultural and Professional Advancement in Europe), students may earn a Diploma in European Proficiency (DEP). The diploma is awarded after the successful completion of a Grade 12 credit in a European language, an exchange to Europe of at least seven days and an independent study unit exploring specific elements of European social, economic, political and cultural elements.

The Duke of Edinburgh's Award

With a working partnership with The Duke of Edinburgh's Award, Appleby ensures that students from the age of 14 have the opportunity to complete the requirements of community service, expeditions, skills and physical recreation at the Bronze, Silver and Gold levels. Bronze and Silver awards are approved by the Provincial/Divisional Councils while Gold awards are approved by the National Executive Director on behalf of the Board of Directors. Students are required to complete the requirements for the Bronze award in order to gain an Appleby Diploma.

Course Codes

Course Codes

A common Ministry of Education five-digit course code is used for all secondary school credits. All courses listed with a course code are worth credits towards the OSSD as noted. See the OSSD requirements for more information.

Understanding Course Codes

The first character denotes the area of study to which the course belongs:
  
  A - The Arts
  B - Business Studies
  C - Canadian and World Studies
  D - Data Processing/Computer Studies
  E - English, English as a Second Language, English Literacy   Development
  F - French
  G - Guidance and Career Education
  H - Social Sciences
  I - Information Technology and Interdisciplinary Studies
  L - Classical, International and Native Languages
  M - Mathematics
  N - Native Studies
  P - Health and Physical Education
  S - Science
  T - Technological Education
  
The second and third characters identify the specific course, e.g. SCH3U; for example, CH identifies the course as Chemistry.

The fourth characteridentifies the grade of the course:
  
  1 - Grade 9
  2 - Grade 10
  3 - Grade 11
  4 - Grade 12
  
The fifth characteridentifies the level of difficulty of the course:
  
  D - Academic
  P - Applied
  O - Open
  U - University 
  M - University/College
  C - College
  E - Workplace

Appleby offers D and courses in the Upper School and U and M courses in the Senior School. Entrance requirements vary for each university. Appleby students are expected to graduate with a minimum of four U courses and three additional U or M courses. Courses with option to take Advanced Placement Examinations are marked   

Course Offerings for 2018-19

Program Courses 2018-2019

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Middle One (M1) - Grade 7

The M1 academic program consists of 10 courses: 
-8 required courses and, 
-2 restricted elective courses in French and music.

Required Courses (8):

ENG7J - English
MAT7J - Mathematics
SNC7J - Science
HSC7J - Social Science
PED7J - Healthy Active Living Education
ALC7J - Arts, Learning & Creativity
ART7J - Visual Arts
GLS7X - Guidance

 

Restricted Elective Courses (2):

French - one of the following:
FSF7J - Core French
FSF7J-8J - Core French
FEF7J-8J - Extended French

Music - one of the following: 
AMI7J - Instrumental Music - Band
AMS7J - Instrumental Music - Strings
AMV7J - Music - Vocal/Choral

Middle Two (M2) - Grade 8

The M2 academic program consists of 10 courses: 
-7 required courses and, 
-3 restricted elective courses in French, mathematics, and music.

Required Courses (7):

ENG8J - English
LWM8J - International Languages
(Arabic, German, Mandarin and Spanish)
SNC8J - Science
ART8J - Visual Arts 
PED8J - Healthy Active Living Education
HSC8J - Social Science
GLS8X - Guidance

Restricted Elective Courses (3):

French - one of the following:
FSF8J - Core French
FSF1D8 - Core French
FEF1D - Extended French

Mathematics - one of the following: 
MAT8J - Mathematics 
MPM1DP - Principles of Mathematics

Music - one of the following: 
AMI8J - Instrumental Music - Band
AMS8J - Instrumental Music - Strings
AMV8J - Music - Vocal/Choral

UPPER SCHOOL

Upper One (U1) - Grade 9

The U1 academic program consists of 8 credit courses and 2 non-credit courses: 
-6 required courses and, 
-4 restricted elective courses in French, international languages, mathematics, and visual & performing arts.

Required Credit Courses (4):

ENG1D - English
SNC1D - Science
PPL1O - Healthy Active Living Education 
CGC1D - Issues in Canadian Geography

Required Non-credit Courses (2):

GLS1X - Guidance 
PPL1N - Upper One Outdoor Education

Restricted Elective Courses (4):

French - one of the following:
FSF1D - Core French
FSF1O - Core French
FSF2D9 - Core French
FEF2D- Extended French

International Languages - one of the following: 
International Languages Level 1 - Arabic - LYABD 
International Languages Level 1 - German - LWGBD 
International Languages Level 1 - Mandarin - LKMBD 
International Languages Level 1 - Spanish - LWSBD 

Mathematics - one of the following: 
MPM1D - Principles of Mathematics
MPM2D - Principles of Mathematics
MPM2DP - Principles of Mathematics

Visual & Performing Arts - one of the following: 
ADA1O - Drama
AMI1O - Instrumental Music - Band
AMS1O - Instrumental Music - Strings
AMV1O - Music - Vocal/Choral 
AVI1O - Visual Arts 

 

Upper Two (U2) - Grade 10

The U2 academic program consists of 8.5 credit courses and 2 non-credit courses: 
-6.5 required courses and, 
-2 restricted elective courses in French and mathematics, and, 
-2 elective courses.

Required Credit Courses (4.5):

ENG2D - English
SNC2D - Science
CHC2D - Canadian History Since WW1
HRT3M5 - World Religions (0.5) credit 
GLC2O5 - Career Studies (0.5) credit 
CHV2O5/S - Civics and Citizenship (0.5 credit, online or online summer)

Required Non-credit Courses (2):

GLS2X - Guidance 
PPL2N - Upper Two Outdoor Education

Restricted Elective Courses (2):

French - one of the following:
FSF2D - Core French
FSF3U - Core French
FEF3U - Extended French

Mathematics - one of the following: 
MFM2P - Foundations of Mathematics
MPM2D - Principles of Mathematics
MCR3U - Functions
MCR3UP - Functions

Elective Courses (2) - two of the following:

Language & Culture 
FSF2O - Core French, Open
International Languages Level 2 - Arabic - LYACU 
International Languages Level 2 - German - LWGCU 
International Languages Level 2 - Mandarin - LKMCU 
International Languages Level 2 - Spanish - LWSCU 

Health and Physical Education 
PAF2O - Healthy Living and Personal and Fitness Activities
PPL2O - Healthy Active Living Education 

Mathematics and Computer Studies 
ICS3U - Introduction to Computer Science

Visual & Performing Arts 
ATC2O - Dance 
ADA2O - Drama 
AME2O - Small Ensemble - Jazz 
AMI2O - Instrumental Music - Band 
AMS2O - Instrumental Music - Strings 
AMV2O - Music - Vocal/Choral 
ASM2O - Media Arts 
AVI2O - Visual Arts 

 

SENIOR SCHOOL

Senior One (S1) - Grade 11

The S1 academic program* consists of 8 credit courses and 1 non-credit course: 
-2 required courses and, 
-3 restricted elective courses in mathematics, science and social science and, 
-4 elective courses. 
*Please see note at the end of the course offerings regarding S1 course load.

Required Credit Course (1):

ENG3U - English - AP English Language & Composition
ENG3UP - English - AP Seminar

Required Non-credit Course (1):

GLU3X - Guidance 

Restricted Elective Courses (3):

Mathematics - at least one of the following:
MCF3M - Functions and Applications
MCR3U - Functions
MHF4U - Advanced Functions
MHF4UP - Advanced Functions 
MDM4U - Mathematics of Data Management 
MDM4UP - Mathematics of Data Management - AP Statistics 

Science - at least one of the following:
SBI3U - Biology 
SCH3U - Chemistry 
SPH3U - Physics 
SPH3UP - Physics - AP Physics 1 
SVN3M - Environmental Science 

Social Science - at least one of the following:
CHI4U - Canada: History, Identity, Culture - AP United States History 
CGW4U - Canadian and World Issues - AP Human Georgraphy 
HSB4U - Challenge and Change in Society 
CGR4M - The Environment and Resource Management 

Elective Courses (4) - Choose four electives from restricted elective courses (above) and/or from the following:

English
EMS3O - Media Studies: Media, Information and Technoculture 

Health and Physical Education
PAF3O - Healthy Living and Personal and Fitness Activities
PPL3O - Healthy Active Living Education
PLF4MN - Recreation and Healthy Active Living Leadership 
PLF4MR - Recreation and Healthy Active Living Leadership 

Language and Culture
FSF3U - Core French
FSF4U - Core French
FEF4U - Extended French - AP French Language and Culture
International Languages Level 3 - Arabic - LYADU 
International Languages Level 3 - German - LWGDU 
International Languages Level 3 - Mandarin - LKMDU 
International Languages Level 3 - Mandarin - AP Chinese Language and Culture - LKMDUP
International Languages Level 3 - Spanish - LWSDU

Mathematics & Computer Studies 
ICS3U -Introduction to Computer Science
ICS4U - Computer Science - AP Computer Science A 

Social Science 
BAF3M - Financial Accounting Fundamentals
BOH4M - Business Leadership

Visual & Performing Arts 
ATC3M - Dance 
ADA3M - Drama 
AME3M - Small Ensemble - Jazz 
AMI3M - Instrumental Music - Band 
AMS3M - Instrumental Music - Strings 
AMV3M - Music - Vocal/Choral 
ASM3M - Media Arts 
AVI3M - Visual Arts 
TGJ3M - Communications Technology

eLearning
HSP3Ue - Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology & Sociology 

Non-Credit Electives

Guidance
GUK3X - U.K. Guidance
GUS3X - U.S. Guidance

*S1 Course Load
A S1 student may be able to take a reduced course load of 7 credit courses, with the approval of the Director, Guidance and University Counselling, if all of the following apply: 
-Prior to August 31 of the S1 school year, 17 Ontario Secondary School credits have been completed, including compulsory courses for both the Ontario and Appleby College diplomas 
-Prior to August 31 of the S1 school year, one grade 11 credit (3U or 3M) must be completed with a final grade of at least 75% 
-The reduced course load must still include the "Required" and "Restricted Elective" courses

Senior Two (S2) - Grade 12

The S2 academic program* consists of 6 or 7 credit courses and 1 non-credit course: 
-2 required courses and, 
-5 or 6 elective courses. 
*Please see note at the end of the course offerings regarding S2 course load.

Required Credit Course (1):

ENG4U - English - AP English Literature & Composition
ENG4UP - English - AP Research

Required Non-credit Course (1):

GLU4X - Guidance 

Elective Courses (5 or 6):

Choose five or six electives from the following:

English
EWC4U - The Writer's Craft 

Health and Physical Education
PAF4O - Healthy Living and Personal and Fitness Activities
PSK4UF - Introductory Kinesiology
PSK4UN - Introductory Kinesiology - Outdoor Education

Language and Culture
FSF4U - Core French
FEF4U - Extended French - AP French Language and Culture
International Languages Level 3 - Arabic - LYADU 
International Languages Level 3 - German - LWGDU 
International Languages Level 3 - Mandarin - LKMDU 
International Languages Level 3 - Mandarin - AP Chinese Language and Culture - LKMDUP 
International Languages Level 3 - Spanish - LWSDU 

Mathematics and Computer Science
MHF4U - Advanced Functions
MCV4U - Calculus and Vectors
MCV4UP - Calculus and Vectors - AP Calculus AB
MDM4U - Mathematics of Data Management 
MDM4UP - Mathematics of Data Management - AP Statistics 
ICS4U - Computer Science - AP Computer Science A 
IDC4UM - Interdisciplinary Studies: Advanced Mathematics - AP Calculus BC

Science
SBI4U - Biology 
SBI4UP - Biology - AP Biology 
SCH4U - Chemistry 
SCH4UP - Chemistry - AP Chemistry
SNC4M - Science
SPH4U - Physics
SPH4UP - Physics - AP Physics 2

Social Science
BAT4M - Financial Accounting Principles
BBB4M - International Business Fundamentals
CGR4M - The Environment and Resource Management 
BBB4M - International Business Fundamentals 
CHI4U - Canada: History, Identity, Culture - AP United States History 
CGW4U - Canadian and World Issues - A Geographic Analysis - AP Human Georgraphy 
CHY4U - World History - AP World History
CIA4U - Analysing Current Economic Issues - AP Macroeconomics
CLN4U - Canadian and International Law
CPW4U - Canadian and International Politics
HHG4M - Human Development - AP Psychology
HSB4U - Challenge and Change in Society 
HZT4U - Philosophy
LVV4U - Classical Civilization

Visual & Performing Arts 
ATC4M - Dance 
ADA4M - Drama 
AME4M - Small Ensemble - Jazz 
AMI4M - Instrumental Music - Band 
AMS4M - Instrumental Music - Strings 
AMV4M - Music - Vocal/Choral 
AVI4M - Visual Arts 
AWU4M - Visual Arts: Cultural/Historical Studies - AP Art History
TGJ4M - Communications Technology

eLearning
SES4Ue - Earth and Space Science (online)
LVV4Ue - Classical Civilizations (online)

*S2 Course Load
The typical S2 course load is 6 grade 12 credits with a maximum of 1 credit online, with approval, completed during the S2 academic year. A S2 student may be able to take a reduced course load of 5 credit courses, with the approval of the Director, Guidance and University Counselling, if all of the following apply: 
-Prior to August 31 of the S2 school year, 25 Ontario Secondary School credits have been completed, including compulsory courses for both the Ontario and Appleby College diplomas 
-Prior to August 31 of the S2 school year, two grade 12 credits (4U or 4M) must be completed with a final grade of at least 85% 
-The reduced course load must still include the "Required" ENG4U course

A S2 student may be able to take a course load of 8 credit courses with the approval of the Director, Guidance and University Counselling.

Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions 2018-19

English

English

The Appleby English program prepares students for the study of university English and develops competence in speaking, written expression and reading that is instrumental in the pursuit of other disciplines. Students follow a structured curriculum from Middle One to Senior Two.

The Appleby program is literature-based, with emphasis on the integration of a critical awareness of language and media. Thus, the aim is to achieve a balance of these elements in the student’s oral and written expression. All courses concentrate on developing the students’ abilities to understand and convey information; to evaluate and present facts and opinions; to express experience, emotions and imagination; to manipulate conventions such as paragraphing, sentence structure, punctuation and spelling; to recognize implicit meaning; and to cultivate an awareness of style. Since 2002, students study English in small classes at an oval table (the Harkness table). This model demonstrates Appleby’s commitment to an ideal of active, participatory, student-centred learning which values teaching students not just course content, but the skills required to become their own and each other's teachers.

The program encourages good reading habits, independent and self-motivated learning, the development of media literacy and the practical use of new technologies. For students to realize the importance of reading and to nurture it as a lifelong habit, students will be expected to read at least one novel from the syllabus of their upcoming year’s work during the summer. The English Department Head and Curriculum Chair provide details of the next year’s reading lists toward the end of the school year.

Other important activities are the study of literature reflecting a wide variety of styles, genres, themes, content and period; class discussions led by teacher and students; individual oral presentations enhanced by technology; peer and self-assessment; and course enrichment according to the design of the teacher. Students are continually assessed and evaluated through oral and written work, performance tasks and examinations.

Middle One Required

English - ENG7J

The Middle One course determines students’ grasp of oral and written components in the English language. The writing program incorporates formal grammar, research skills, diction and complex sentence structures. Students read, analyze, review and critique the creative efforts of their peer group. The literature course includes myths, novels, poetry and drama. The emphasis is on comprehension and assimilation of detail in order to present opinion. As well, written and oral expression is also emphasized as an important skill to develop. Students are also introduced to writing an analytical literary essay in which they are required to create an outline and rough draft with peer editing leading to a final draft. Note taking and organizational skill building using the computer and written notes is essential for success. All students participate in the annual poetry writing contest and recital.

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Middle Two Required

English - ENG8J

The Middle Two year continues the program outlined in Middle One, but with greater emphasis on independent organizational skills. Literature is presented thematically through novels, short stories, poetry, media and drama. Students further develop their written skills in their understanding of essay style and grammar and use computers for outlining, drafting, note taking, and organizing. All students participate in the annual interpretive reading event and short story competition. The course encourages critical-thinking skills, close reading strategies and a wider span of reading.

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Required

English - ENG1D

This course is designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 academic English course, which leads to university or college preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Required

English - AP English Language & Composition - ENG3U AP Logo

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course. This course leads to the AP English Language & Composition examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ENG2D

English - AP Capstone Seminar - ENG3UP AP Logo

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course or the AP Capstone Research course. AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analysing divergent lenses and perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analysing articles, research studies, and foundational literary and philosophical texts; they will also listen to and view speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts, while experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyse and evaluate information in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments. Acceptance into this program requires students to complete an application and participate in an interview.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ENG2D and approval of the English Department required

Senior One Elective

Media Studies: Media, Information and Technoculture - EMS3O

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills that will enable students to understand media communication in the twenty-first century and to use media effectively and responsibly. Through analysing the forms and messages of a variety of media works and audience responses to them, and through creating their own media works, students will develop critical thinking skills, aesthetic and ethical judgement, and skills in viewing, representing, listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ENG2D

Senior Two Required

English - AP English Literature & Composition - ENG4U AP Logo

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace. This course leads to the AP English Literature & Composition examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ENG3U

English - AP Capstone Seminar - ENG4UP AP Logo

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace. AP Research is an enriched course that builds on and advances the skills established in AP Seminar. Students will develop and refine their research skills by exploring topics both guided by the teacher and by their own interests, while considering various research methodologies. Developing the inquiry framework from AP Seminar, students will work to develop and refine a research methodology apply this to a topic of their choosing, and pursue their own research project. Student research will culminate in a paper and a presentation.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ENG3UP

Senior Two Electives

The Writer's Craft - EWC4U

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students will analyse models of effective writing; use a workshop approach to produce a range of works; identify and use techniques required for specialized forms of writing; and identify effective ways to improve the quality of their writing. They will also complete a major paper as part of a creative or analytical independent study project and investigate opportunities for publication and for writing careers.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ENG3U

Interdisciplinary Studies: Media Studies, Technoculture, and Writing in the Digital Age - IDC4UX

This course combines the expectations for Interdisciplinary Studies, Grade 12 University Preparation with selected expectations from ASM4M and ETS4U. Students will learn in an interdisciplinary environment while being introduced to the field of cultural studies and extending their knowledge of media studies. Students will investigate media, both form and content, as an important expression of culture in contemporary society as well as exploring how this has shifted over time. Students will learn about the conventions of media analysis, work with the ideological lenses that inform the discipline of media studies, and explore current events and their presentation in contemporary media. Students will also investigate the ways that culture both shapes and is shaped by technology and how communication technologies impact the way we express our ideas and process information about the world. Cumulatively, students will acquire the critical thinking, writing and publishing skills needed to collectively produce a digital online publication. 
Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ENG3U 

 

 

Mathematics and Computer Studies

Mathematics and Computer Studies

The mathematics program at Appleby College provides a solid foundation for the study of mathematics at the university level. Students develop fundamental skills and an understanding of applied mathematical concepts utilizing a variety of tablet-based software applications, preparing them to further explore and visualize mathematical relationships. From a common enriched curriculum at the Middle One level, students follow a path that prepares them for the diverse mathematics courses they may encounter in university. For students interested in taking Advanced Placement courses in Calculus (AB and BC) or Statistics in their senior years, a vertically integrated Advanced Placement stream of courses is available.

 Mathematics

 Middle School Mathematics

The goal of the mathematics program at the middle school level is to provide an enriched curriculum that challenges students regardless of their previous background in mathematics. In Middle One students take a common course that explores topics from the Ontario curriculum in grades 7, 8 and 9. Topics, activities and instruction are differentiated as needed to meet the needs of individual students. In Middle Two students continue on one of two paths. Some will require more reinforcement in grade 7 and 8 topics while others will proceed with additional grade 9 topics eventually completing the credit for mathematics at the grade 9 level.

Middle One

Mathematics - MAT7J

In addition to the mathematical concepts from grade 7, this course also introduces students to grade 8 and grade 9 topics in mathematics. Topics, activities and instruction are differentiated to meet the needs of individual students. The course considers number relationships and builds on previous knowledge of divisibility rules, prime and composite numbers, exponents, and order of operations. The concept of a variable is introduced through patterning and students solve equations using opposite operations. Ratio, proportionality, fractions and data management are topics investigated through real-life applications. Measurement and geometry are discussed in a two-dimensional context.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Middle Two

Students must select one of the following courses.

Mathematics - MAT8J

This course continues to study integers and solving equations algebraically. Data management topics include analyzing data both numerically and graphically and this leads to the concept of slope and equations of linear relationships. Investigations are used to explore both theoretical and experimental probability and measurement and geometry are discussed in a three-dimensional context. Analytic geometry and advanced algebraic techniques are topics accessible to students who are preparing to complete the grade 9 mathematics credit.

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % 
Pre-Requisite: MAT7J

Principles of Mathematics - MPM1DP

This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course is designed for inquisitive mathematicians who would like the opportunity to learn in a faster-paced environment, with enriched material, in order to prepare for Advanced Placement Calculus courses in the future.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: Approval of the Mathematics Department is required

Upper One

Students must select one of the following courses.

Principles of Mathematics - MPM2DP

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course is designed for inquisitive mathematicians who would like the opportunity to learn in a faster-paced environment, with enriched material, in order to prepare for Advanced Placement Calculus courses in the future.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MPM1DP or approval of the Mathematics Department is required

Principles of Mathematics - MPM1D

This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Principles of Mathematics - MPM2D

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MPM1D or MPM1DP

Upper Two

Students must select one of the following courses.

Foundations of Mathematics - MFM2P

This course enables students to consolidate their understanding of linear relations and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and hands-on activities. Students will develop and graph equations in analytic geometry; solve and apply linear systems, using real-life examples; and explore and interpret graphs of quadratic relations. Students will investigate similar triangles, the trigonometry of right triangles, and the measurement of three-dimensional figures. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: MPM1D or MPM1DP

Principles of Mathematics - MPM2D

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: MPM1D or MPM1DP

Functions - MCR3UP

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course is designed for inquisitive mathematicians who would like the opportunity to learn in a faster-paced environment, with enriched material, in order to prepare for Advanced Placement Calculus courses in the future.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MPM2DP or approval of the Mathematics Department required

Functions - MCR3U

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MPM2D or MPM2DP

Senior One

Students must select one of the following courses.

Functions and Applications - MCF3M

This course introduces basic features of the function by extending students’ experiences with quadratic relations. It focuses on quadratic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and their use in modelling real-world situations. Students will represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically; simplify expressions; solve equations; and solve problems relating to applications. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: MPM2D or MPM2DP

Functions - MCR3U

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MPM2D or MPM2DP

If students have completed MCR3U they may choose one of the following:

Mathematics of Data Management - MDM4U
See course description under Senior Two mathematics 
Mathematics of Data Management - AP Statistics - MDM4UP
See course description under Senior Two mathematics 
Advanced Functions - MHF4U
See course description under Senior Two mathematics

Advanced Functions - MHF4UP

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs. This course is designed for inquisitive mathematicians who would like the opportunity to learn in a faster paced environment, with enriched material, in order to prepare for Advanced Placement Calculus courses in the future.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MCR3UP or approval of the Mathematics Department is required

Senior Two Electives

All students have now completed their Mathematics requirements and can choose from the following courses.

Mathematics of Data Management - MDM4U

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MCF3M or MCR3U or MCR3UP

Mathematics of Data Management - MDM4U

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MCF3M or MCR3U or MCR3UP

Mathematics of Data Management - AP Statistics - MDM4UP AP Logo

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest. The course includes additional topics in complex data collection and analysis to prepare student for the AP Statistics examination. The course is the equivalent of a first year university course in Statistics; the concepts are challenging and the pace is quick. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MCR3U or MCR3UP and approval of the Mathematics Department is required

Advanced Functions - MHF4U

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: MCR3U or MCR3UP

Calculus and Vectors - MCV4U

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: MHF4U

Advanced Functions - MHF4US

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs. This version of Advanced Functions is intended for students also taking Calculus and Vectors in the same academic year. Advanced Functions will be scheduled from September to January and Calculus and Vectors will be scheduled from February to June.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: MCR3U or MCR3UP

Calculus and Vectors - MCV4US

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course. This version of Calculus and Vectors is intended for students also taking Advanced Functions in the same academic year. Advanced Functions will be scheduled from September to January and Calculus and Vectors will be scheduled from February to June.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: MHF4US

Calculus and Vectors - AP Calculus AB - MCV4UP AP Logo

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course. The course includes additional topics in calculus to prepare students for the AP Calculus AB examination. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MHF4UP or approval of the Mathematics Department is required

Interdisciplinary Studies: Advanced Mathematics - AP Calculus BC - IDC4UM AP Logo

This course combines the expectations for Interdisciplinary Studies, Grade 12 University preparation with selected expectations from two or more other courses based on student interest. Students will engage with, research, and discuss important ideas in modern and classical mathematics, including mathematical induction, complex numbers, conic sections, linear algebra, and integral calculus. Students will use and apply these ideas in a variety of realistic situations in a field of their choice (for example, engineering, epidemiology, economics, business, or health). Students will learn to analyze their own and other’s mathematical work critically, and interpret and explain results for both the mathematical specialist and the layperson. This course prepares students for the AP Calculus BC examination. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: MCV4UP or concurrently enrolled in MCV4UP and the approval of the Mathematics Department.

Computer Studies

The computer science courses offered at Appleby College are designed to give students an understanding of essential concepts of programming and logic. The courses are not only for students interested in pursuing a career in Computer Science or Engineering, but are designed to support students interested in business, science and a variety of other subject areas. A wide range of topics beyond conventional programming skills are explored. Environmental impact and social issues surrounding current and future technology are two important areas routinely discussed. The courses help students develop their ability to logically approach a variety of problems and implement effective solutions. In both the Senior One and Senior Two courses students program using a language called Java. Java is an object oriented programming language widely used in industry. In addition, Java is expected knowledge for students who wish to write the Advanced Placement Computer Science Examination. Students will leave this program with the ability to reflect on technology in society, program in Java and most importantly, transfer the underlying skills to other problems and programming languages.

Upper Two Elective

Introduction to Computer Science - ICS3U

This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use subprograms within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computer-related fields.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Elective

Introduction to Computer Science - ICS3U

This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use subprograms within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computer-related fields.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Computer Science - AP Computer Science A - ICS4U AP Logo

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyse algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field. This course leads to the AP Computer Science A examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write the Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ICS3U

Senior Two Elective

Computer Science - AP Computer Science A - ICS4U AP Logo

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyse algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field. This course leads to the AP Computer Science A examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write the Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ICS3U

Science

Science

The study of science allows a student to make a personal search for the logical patterns that explain the behaviour of the universe. Scientific study also develops skills in thinking and problem solving, developing the overall academic abilities of each student. Lessons on the scientific method can also be applied to other areas of study and to many aspects of life. Appleby’s Science and Technology program provides students with the opportunity to develop the attitudes and skills of scientific thinking, helping them make sense of the rapidly expanding technological world. Students are also made aware of the impact of science on society and career opportunities open to those with an aptitude for science. These skills enable students to understand the major concepts of science, how the concepts were developed and how they are used to explain the behaviour of the natural world.

Curiosity, honesty, rationality, perseverance and a concern for the environment are some of the attitudes that are encouraged in this program, provided through a learning continuum from Middle One through Senior Two and through opportunities for interdisciplinary explorations. All courses are taught in fully equipped modern laboratories by subject specialists, making full use of a laptop and a variety of probeware. Students are encouraged to apply scientific techniques and to handle equipment intelligently and safely to gain knowledge of a phenomenon, formulate a mental or physical model to represent it and develop experiments to test the model. A variety of evaluation tools are used, including everything from authentic performance tasks to periodic tests and examinations. The weight given to any of these evaluation tools varies by the grade level.

Middle One Required

Science - SNC7J

Students learn through scientific investigation. Middle One units include interactions within the environment, pure substances and mixtures, heat in the environment and form and function. In the course of these units, and through hands-on lab exercises, students obtain skills in exploration, experimentation, observation and measurement, and analysis and dissemination of data.

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Science - SNC7J

Students learn through scientific investigation. Middle One units include interactions within the environment, pure substances and mixtures, heat in the environment and form and function. In the course of these units, and through hands-on lab exercises, students obtain skills in exploration, experimentation, observation and measurement, and analysis and dissemination of data.

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Middle Two Required

Science - SNC8J

Middle Two students explore four units of study throughout the year, including fluids, systems in action, water systems, and cells. Through laboratory experimentation, science fair projects, as well as group and independent work, students build upon the skills introduced in Middle One.

Evaluation: Term Work - 80 % Summative Evaluation - 20 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Science - SNC8J

Middle Two students explore four units of study throughout the year, including fluids, systems in action, water systems, and cells. Through laboratory experimentation, science fair projects, as well as group and independent work, students build upon the skills introduced in Middle One.

Evaluation: Term Work - 80 % Summative Evaluation - 20 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper One Required

Science - SNC1D

The Upper School science curriculum is a 2-year programme which enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to relate science to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout the course students will develop their skills in the processes of scientific investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; the study of the universe and its properties and components; and forces that affect climate and climate change.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Science - SNC1D

The Upper School science curriculum is a 2-year programme which enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to relate science to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout the course students will develop their skills in the processes of scientific investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; the study of the universe and its properties and components; and forces that affect climate and climate change.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Required

Science - SNC2D

The Upper School science curriculum is a 2-year programme which enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. In the Upper Two course, students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid–base reactions; the interaction of light and matter and the principles of electricity.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC1D

Science - SNC2D

The Upper School science curriculum is a 2-year programme which enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. In the Upper Two course, students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid–base reactions; the interaction of light and matter and the principles of electricity.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC1D

Senior One Required

Students must select at least one of the following options.

Biology - SBI3U

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Chemistry - SCH3U

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Biology - SBI3U

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Physics - SPH3U

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Chemistry - SCH3U

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Physics - SPH3U

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Physics - AP Physics 1 - SPH3UP AP Logo

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. This course includes additional topics to prepare students for the AP Physics 1 examination. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Environmental Science - SVN3M

This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge of and skills relating to environmental science that will help them succeed in life after secondary school. Students will explore a range of topics, including the role of science in addressing contemporary environmental challenges; the impact of the environment on human health; sustainable agriculture and forestry; the reduction and management of waste; and the conservation of energy. Students will increase their scientific and environmental literacy and examine the interrelationships between science, the environment, and society in a variety of areas.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Physics - AP Physics 1 - SPH3UP AP Logo

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. This course includes additional topics to prepare students for the AP Physics 1 examination. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Environmental Science - SVN3M

This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge of and skills relating to environmental science that will help them succeed in life after secondary school. Students will explore a range of topics, including the role of science in addressing contemporary environmental challenges; the impact of the environment on human health; sustainable agriculture and forestry; the reduction and management of waste; and the conservation of energy. Students will increase their scientific and environmental literacy and examine the interrelationships between science, the environment, and society in a variety of areas.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Senior Two Electives

Science - SNC4M

This course enables students, including those pursuing post-secondary programs outside the sciences, to increase their understanding and contemporary social and environmental issues in health-related fields. Students will explore a variety of medical technologies, pathogens and disease, nutritional science, public health issues, and biotechnology. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study and helps refine students' scientific investigation skills.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D or SVM3M or SCH3U or SBI3U or SPH3U
 

Biology - SBI4U

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: SBI3U and SCH3U or permission of the teacher

Earth and Space Science - SES4U

This course develops students’ understanding of Earth and its place in the universe. Students will investigate the properties of and forces in the universe and solar system and analyse techniques scientists use to generate knowledge about them. Students will closely examine the materials of Earth, its internal and surficial processes, and its geological history, and will learn how Earth’s systems interact and how they have changed over time. Throughout the course, students will learn how these forces, processes, and materials affect their daily lives. The course draws on biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics in its consideration of geological and astronomical processes that can be observed directly or inferred from other evidence.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Biology- SBI4U

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: SBI3U and SCH3U or permission of the teacher

Biology - AP Biology - SBI4UP AP Logo

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields. This course includes additional topics to prepare students for the AP Biology examination. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: SBI3U and SCH3U or permission of the teacher

Chemistry - SCH4U

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SCH3U

Biology - AP Biology - SBI4UP AP Logo

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields. This course includes additional topics to prepare students for the AP Biology examination. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: SBI3U and SCH3U or permission of the teacher

Chemistry - AP Chemistry - SCH4UP AP Logo

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment. This course includes additional topics to prepare students for the AP Chemistry examination. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SCH3U

Chemistry - SCH4U

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SCH3U

Chemistry - AP Chemistry - SCH4UP AP Logo

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment. This course includes additional topics to prepare students for the AP Chemistry examination. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SCH3U

Physics - SPH4U

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SPH3U or SPH3UP

Physics - AP Physics 2 - SPH4UP AP Logo

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. This course includes additional topics to prepare students for the AP Physics 2 examination. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SPH3U or SPH3UP

Physics - SPH4U

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SPH3U or SPH3UP

Physics - AP Physics 2 - SPH4UP AP Logo

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. This course includes additional topics to prepare students for the AP Physics 2 examination. Students are expected to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SPH3U or SPH3U

Visual and Performing Arts

Visual and Performing Arts

The performing arts - dance, drama, and music - present opportunities and challenges as individual academic courses. In conjunction with the visual and media arts, students, faculty and the school community benefit from creative, expressive, and performance opportunities.

Music and Visual Arts are required courses of study in the Middle School, and students must choose at least one credit in Music, Visual Arts, or Drama in Upper One.

Students pursuing elective courses in all four streams have the opportunity to take History of the Arts, a university-level AP course. Each of the disciplines involves practical, theoretical, and presentation elements and the courses are designed for a wide range of student interests and abilities, including those students who wish to pursue university arts programs.

Music

Music at Appleby offers an exceptional outlet for those with an interest in creating music. With an emphasis on performing, the program focuses on developing musically literate students through performance, aural skills, and creative exercises. Students also gain real-life experiences through field trips into the community to perform at professional venues. International performance excursions are offered as further enrichment.

The music program also offers the study of music history and theory, which help students develop the ability to interpret music and describe musical concepts with correct terminology. Students are introduced to diverse musical styles from around the world. Performance and analysis material includes the European classical repertoire, jazz and popular music, folk songs, Canadian music, and music from non-Western traditions.

As part of the academic requirement, all students in Senior One and Senior Two music courses are encouraged to participate in a school musical ensemble in the co-curricular or club programs. These programs offers a variety of ensemble options from which to choose, such as Concert Band, Orchestra, Chapel Choir, and Cantus Choir. Students at each grade level select from a variety of performance media as outlined below:

E-Jazz Band - students study music through the experience of playing in a stage band setting. The course provides opportunities for the study of the technique and the art of jazz. Note: This stream begins at the Upper Two level. Students who wish to enrol in this stream should choose the "I - Instrumental Band" stream for Upper One.

I - Instrumental Band - woodwind, brass, percussion in a concert band setting. Repertoire is chosen from traditional band literature and popular music.

S - Strings Performance - violin, viola, cello and bass in a chamber setting. Music is chosen from the Western European repertoire and arranged for the ensemble in each class.

V - Vocal Music - students explore both technical and artistic sides of singing in musical theatre, gospel, folk and classical repertoire.

Students enrolled in an instrumental program (instrumental, Jazz, strings) are required to provide their own instruments. Many economically feasible options are available, including a limited number of instruments for rental from Appleby College. Students are required to purchase their vocal scores as part of their textbook fees.

Middle One Required

Instrumental Music - Band - AMI7J

This introductory course provides group instruction on band instruments (brass, woodwind, and percussion). Students study the basic elements of music including history and theory, and learn rudimentary skills on their instruments. This course provides the opportunity to explore a variety of musical styles and to participate in an ensemble setting.

Evaluation: Term Work - 100% Pre-Requisite: None

Instrumental Music - Strings - AMS7J

This introductory course provides group instruction on stringed instruments (violin, viola, cello, and double bass). Students study the basic elements of music including history and theory, and learn rudimentary skills on their instruments. This course provides the opportunity to explore a variety of musical styles and to participate in an ensemble setting.

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % Pre-Requisite: None

Music - Vocal/Choral AMV7J

This introductory course provides group instruction in vocal studies. Students study the basic elements of music including history and theory, and learn rudimentary vocal technique. This course provides the opportunity to explore a variety of musical styles and to participate in an ensemble setting.

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % Pre-Requisite: None

Middle Two Required

Instrumental Music - Band - AMI8J

Most students in the Middle Two music course have a music background of one or two years. Students in Middle Two music continue the stream chosen in Middle One, developing their band performance skills, and studying the elements of music through listening and performance. Theory is studied in greater detail and is based on the repertoire requirements. Participation in the class ensemble is a focus of the course.

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Instrumental Music - Strings - AMS8J

Most students in the Middle Two music course have a music background of one or two years. Students in Middle Two music continue the stream chosen in Middle One, developing their strings performance skills, and studying the elements of music through listening and performance. Theory is studied in greater detail and is based on the repertoire requirements. Participation in the class ensemble is a focus of the course.

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Music - Vocal/Choir - AMV8J

Most students in the Middle Two music course have a music background of one or two years. Students in Middle Two music continue the stream chosen in Middle One, developing their vocal performance skills, and studying the elements of music through listening and performance. Theory is studied in greater detail and is based on the repertoire requirements. Participation in the class ensemble is a focus of the course. Choreography is also included in this course. Pre-Requisite: None

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper One Electives

Instrumental Music - Band AMI1O

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience and is aimed at developing technique, sensitivity, and imagination. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop an understanding of the conventions and elements of music and of safe practices related to music, and will develop a variety of skills transferrable to other areas of their life. Students in this course will play a variety of concert band repertoire at the B200 level. Students will choose a band instrument from the woodwind, brass, and concert percussion families.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Instrumental Music - Strings - AMS1O

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience and is aimed at developing technique, sensitivity, and imagination. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop an understanding of the conventions and elements of music and of safe practices related to music, and will develop a variety of skills transferable to other areas of their life. Students in this course will reinforce advanced playing techniques, be introduced to minor scales, and performance practice techniques. Students will choose from violin, viola, cello, and double bass.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Music - Vocal/Choral - AMV1O

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience and is aimed at developing technique, sensitivity, and imagination. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop an understanding of the conventions and elements of music and of safe practices related to music, and will develop a variety of skills transferable to other areas of their life. Students in this course will sing a variety of repertoire in solo, small ensemble, and large vocal ensemble settings and will learn basic solfege for sight singing and musicianship.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Electives

Small Ensemble - Jazz - AME2O

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures. Students in this course will be introduced to improvisation, harmony, form and, music history with a greater focus on the idiom of Jazz and its sub-genres. Instrumentation for this course includes rhythm section, saxophones, trumpets, and trombones.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: None

Instrumental Music - Band - AMI2O

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures. Students in this course will play a variety of concert band repertoire at the B200/B300 level. Intermediate performance techniques will be developed and the rudiments of analysis and transposition will be studied.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: None

Instrumental Music - Strings - AMS2O

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures. Students in this course will reinforce advanced playing techniques, be introduced to minor scales, and performance practice techniques. Students will choose from violin, viola, cello, and double bass.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Music - Vocal/Choral - AMV2O

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures. Students in this course will sing a variety of vocal repertoire in solo, small ensemble, and large vocal ensemble settings. Students will learn basic solfege for sight singing and musicianship as well as begin foreign language singing in large ensemble.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Electives

Small Ensemble - Jazz - AME3M

This course provides students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music, including traditional, commercial, and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical exercises and repertoire and will employ the critical analysis processes when reflecting on, responding to, and analyzing live and recorded performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers. Students in this course will continue to develop a practical understanding of improvisation, harmony, form, and music history with a greater focus on the idiom of Jazz and its sub-genres. Instrumentation for this course includes rhythm section, saxophones, trumpets, and trombones.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AME2O or by audition/instructor permission

Instrumental Music - Band - AMI3M

This course provides students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music, including traditional, commercial, and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical exercises and repertoire and will employ the critical analysis processes when reflecting on, responding to, and analyzing live and recorded performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers. Students in this course will perform a wide variety of concert band music at the B300 level. Students will practice transposition and arranging for their instrument and ensemble. Participation in one of the school co-curricular or club ensemble activities is an encouraged part of this academic program.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AMI2O or by audition/instructor permission

Instrumental Music - Strings- AMS3M

This course provides students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music, including traditional, commercial, and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical exercises and repertoire and will employ the critical analysis processes when reflecting on, responding to, and analyzing live and recorded performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers. Students in this course will apply advanced playing techniques to strings music repertoire ranging from the Renaissance to 20th Century, including non-Western music.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AMS2O or by audition/instructor permission

Music Vocal/Choral - AMV3M

This course provides students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music, including traditional, commercial, and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical exercises and repertoire and will employ the critical analysis processes when reflecting on, responding to, and analyzing live and recorded performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers. Students in this course will sing a variety of vocal repertoire in solo, small ensemble, and large vocal ensemble settings. Students will learn and perform foreign language repertoire in both solo and large ensemble settings. Lyric memorization, movement, and choreography are all included in this course.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AMV2O or by audition/instructor permission

Senior Two Electives

Small Ensemble - Jazz - AME4M

This course emphasizes advanced performance skills in a variety of styles of solo and ensemble settings. Students concentrate on developing interpretive skills and the ability to work independently and as a leader in an ensemble. Musical analysis focuses on Romantic, 20th-century and contemporary eras. Students use theoretical concepts to create their own music. Students explore the elements of musical theory through arranging and composition. Students in this course will continue to develop a practical understanding of improvisation, harmony, form and music history with a greater focus on the idiom of Jazz and its sub-genres. Instrumentation for this course includes rhythm section, saxes, trumpets, and trombones.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AME3M or by audition/instructor permission

Instrumental Music - Band - AMI4M

This course emphasizes advanced performance skills in a variety of styles of solo and ensemble settings. Students concentrate on developing interpretive skills and the ability to work independently and as a leader in an ensemble. Musical analysis focuses on Romantic, 20th-century and contemporary eras. Students use theoretical concepts to create their own music. Students explore the elements of musical theory through arranging and composition. Students in this course will perform a wide variety of concert band music at the B300/B400 level. Students will refine their transposition and arranging skills.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AMI3M or by audition/instructor permission

Instrumental Music - Strings - AMS4M

This course emphasizes advanced performance skills in a variety of styles of solo and ensemble settings. Students concentrate on developing interpretive skills and the ability to work independently and as a leader in an ensemble. Musical analysis focuses on Romantic, 20th-century and contemporary eras. Students use theoretical concepts to create their own music. Students explore the elements of musical theory through arranging and composition. Students in this course will apply advanced playing techniques to strings music repertoire ranging from the Renaissance to 20th Century, including non-Western music.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AMS3M or by audition/instructor permission

Music - Vocal/Choral - AMV4M

This course emphasizes advanced performance skills in a variety of styles of solo and ensemble settings. Students concentrate on developing interpretive skills and the ability to work independently and as a leader in an ensemble. Musical analysis focuses on Romantic, 20th-century and contemporary eras. Students use theoretical concepts to create their own music. Students explore the elements of musical theory through arranging and composition. Students in this course will sing a variety of vocal repertoire in solo, small ensemble, and large vocal ensemble settings. Students will learn and perform foreign language repertoire in both solo and large ensemble settings. Lyric memorization, movement, and choreography are all included in this course.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AMV3M or by audition/instructor permission

External Music Credits

Music - External (Conservatory) - AMX3M

Students completing Royal Conservatory of Music Grade VII Practical and Grade I Rudiments (or equivalent) may present the documents showing the results to Student Services to receive music credit at the Senior One level or below. This course does not fulfill the Ministry of Education or Appleby College compulsory requirements. Official transcripts for both parts must be submitted to Student Services to be granted this credit, which can be earned at any high school grade.

Evaluation: External
Pre-Requisite: None

Music - External (Conservatory) - AMX4M

Students completing Royal Conservatory of Music Grade VIII Practical and Grade II Rudiments (or equivalent) may present the documents showing the results to Student Services to receive one Senior Two music credit. This course does not fulfill the Ministry of Education compulsory or Appleby College compulsory requirements. Official transcripts for both parts must be submitted to Student Services to be granted this credit, which can be earned at any high school grade.

Evaluation: External
Pre-Requisite: None

Comprehensive Arts

Middle One Required

Arts, Learning, and Creativity - ALC7J

In this course, students will create and present work that is an exploration of the elements of drama and dance. This course is active and performance-oriented in both areas with opportunities for reflection.

Evaluation: Term Work - None Summative Evaluation - None 
Pre-Requisite: None

Dance

The Dance program at Appleby College helps build responsiveness to the learning process through body and mind. The courses enable students to develop dance skills, encourage them to explore their creative voice, and teach how to communicate through movement. Student learning includes the processes that form the basis for creating dance, performance-based activities, master classes from professional guest artists that expose them to a plethora of different genres, and ample performance and leadership opportunities. The program also includes the study of the historical development of dance, the specialized vocabulary of dance criticism, and an exploration of dance through various mediums such as aerial dance and site specific pieces. Students develop technical proficiency as well as an aesthetic appreciation for the artistry of dance. Guest artists will be invited to conduct specialty dance workshops to help connect the students to the Toronto dance community, and field trips to various dance related events will be provided to enhance experiential learning. Appleby’s dance studio includes mirrors, barres, a professional-quality sprung dance floor, sound system, and projection system. Dance attire is required.

Upper Two Elective

Dance - ATC2O

This course emphasizes the development of students’ technique and creative skills relating to the elements of dance and the tools of composition in a variety of performance situations. Students will identify responsible personal and interpersonal practices related to dance processes and production, and will apply technologies and techniques throughout the process of creation to develop artistic scope in the dance arts.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Elective

Dance - ATC3M

This course emphasizes the development of students’ artistry, improvisational and compositional skills, and technical proficiency in dance genres from around the world. Students will apply dance elements, techniques, and tools in a variety of ways, including performance situations; describe and model responsible practices related to the dance environment; and reflect on how the study of dance affects personal and artistic development.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ATC2O or permission of the instructor

Senior Two Elective

Dance - ATC4M

This course emphasizes the development of students’ technical proficiency, fluency in the language of movement in dance genres from around the world, and understanding of dance science. Students will explain the social, cultural, and historical contexts of dance; apply the creative process through the art of dance in a variety of ways; and exhibit an understanding of the purpose and possibilities of continuing engagement in the arts as a lifelong learner.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: ATC3M or permission of the instructor

Drama

The Drama program at Appleby is designed to develop dramatic, theatrical, and presentation skills. The courses encourage students to build strong leadership, presentation, observation and communication skills. Through an interdisciplinary approach, students are exposed to all aspects of theatre including mime, mask, movement, voice, improvisation and script work. Students learn the history of various theatrical periods and theatrical terminology through research and written projects as well as through practice. Analysis and critical thinking are also part of the drama process and lead students to assess both their own work and that of their peers in a positive and constructive way. This builds self-confidence, self-discipline and strong teamwork skills. Students learn to respect and appreciate all aspects of theatre arts both as participants and audience members. Students build their confidence and presentation skills by participating in a variety of performance opportunities throughout the year.

Upper One Elective

Drama - ADA1O

This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms and techniques, using material from a wide range of sources and cultures. Students will use the elements of drama to examine situations and issues that are relevant to their lives. Students will create, perform, discuss, and analyze drama, and then reflect on the experiences to develop an understanding of themselves, the art form, and the world around them.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Elective

Drama - ADA2O

This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms, conventions, and techniques. Students will explore a variety of dramatic sources from various cultures and representing a range of genres. Students will use the elements of drama in creating and communicating through dramatic works. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will reflect on their experiences.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Elective

Drama - ADA3M

This course requires students to create and perform in dramatic presentations. Students will analyse, interpret, and perform dramatic works from various cultures and time periods. Students will research various acting styles and conventions that could be used in their presentations, and analyse the functions of playwrights, directors, actors, designers, technicians, and audiences.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ADA1O or ADA2O or permission of the instructor

Senior Two Elective

Drama - ADA4M

This course requires students to experiment individually and collaboratively with forms and conventions of both drama and theatre from various cultures and time periods. Students will interpret dramatic literature and other texts and media sources while learning about various theories of directing and acting. Students will examine the significance of dramatic arts in various cultures, and will analyze how the knowledge and skills developed in drama are related to their personal skills, social awareness, and goals beyond secondary school.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ADA3M

Visual and Media Arts

The study of visual arts forms an important part of the Appleby curriculum. In the studio, emphasis is placed on technical development while exploring a wide variety of traditional media and new technologies. The students’ personal creativity is encouraged as they explore subject matter, themes and compositional problems in order to communicate their artistic ideas.

The art program also includes the study of art history and art criticism, enhancing the students’ understanding in an historical context, as well as allowing them to relate other artists’ styles and techniques to their own. It also allows them to build a visual vocabulary and develops confidence in discussing and writing about art.

Appleby’s visual arts complex includes three drawing, painting and mixed media studios for the exploration of a wide variety of art mediums including drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and ceramics. Artwork is displayed in various gallery spaces throughout the school as a celebration of student achievement.

Media Arts courses at Appleby College offer a creative outlet for students wishing to explore visual communication outside of the realm of traditional arts and are designed to reflect the growing sector of creative careers in new media, animation, filmmaking and graphic design. Working in Appleby’s Mac based Digital Media Studios, students are introduced to industry standard software programs to develop contemporary digital media artworks. Throughout the courses proficiency is achieved in the use of components of the Adobe Creative Cloud Suite and Final Cut Pro. With a focus on media literacy, students learn about marketing strategies and how to tell an effective story for a particular audience. Emphasis is placed on the Principles of Media Arts & Design and the development of a universal cross platform skillset with an aim to place our graduates ahead of the curve in post-secondary programs.

Middle One Required

Visual Arts - ART7J

In this course, students receive formal instruction in visual arts. They acquire a solid foundation of knowledge that helps them express their ideas with increasing confidence, become aware of their environment and build self-esteem. Projects include sculpture, drawing, painting, printmaking, digital design, history, appreciation and criticism.

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Middle Two Required

Visual Arts - ART8J

In this course, students experience formal instruction in visual arts within a balance of art subjects. The course provides students with challenging experiences in a wide variety of media. Practical studio and design activities are integrated with a study of Canadian, Aboriginal/Native/Inuit art and artists as well as art criticism and the study of the elements and principles of design.

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper One Elective

Visual Arts - AVI1O

This general introductory course is a foundation for further courses at the advanced level. It develops visual perception and practical facility in the fundamental techniques of drawing, painting, printmaking, information design, computer graphics and sculpture. The study of design concepts is emphasized. Examples of studio activities include: sketching, perspective drawing, colour theory and painting technique, printmaking, elementary graphics, and three-dimensional design and construction activities. The art history component consists of a study of primitive, Ancient Egyptian art and culture, Modern architecture and Industrial Design.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Electives

Visual Arts - AVI2O

This course enables students to develop their skills in producing and presenting art by introducing them to new ideas, materials, and processes for artistic exploration and experimentation. Students will apply the elements and principles of design when exploring the creative process. Students will use the critical analysis process to reflect on and interpret art within a personal, contemporary, and historical context.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Media Arts - ASM2O

This course enables students to create media art works by exploring new media, emerging technologies such as digital animation, and a variety of traditional art forms such as film, photography, video, and visual arts. Students will acquire communications skills that are transferable beyond the media arts classroom and develop an understanding of responsible practices related to the creative process. Students will develop the skills necessary to create and interpret media art works.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Electives

Visual Arts - AVI3M

This course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in visual arts. Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work that may include drawing, painting, sculpting, and printmaking, as well as the creation of collage, multimedia works, and works using emerging technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AVI1O or AVI2O

Media Arts - ASM3M

This course focuses on the development of media arts skills through the production of art works involving traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and techniques such as new media, computer animation, and web environments. Students will explore the evolution of media arts as an extension of traditional art forms, use the creative process to produce effective media art works, and critically analyze the unique characteristics of this art form. Students will examine the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions of identity, culture, and values.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ASM2O or permission of the instructor with completion of prerequisite summer course work.

Communications Technology - TGJ3M

This course examines communications technology from a media perspective. Students will develop knowledge and skills as they design and produce media projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. These areas may include TV, video, and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues, and will explore college and university programs and career opportunities in the various communications technology fields.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior Two Electives

Visual Arts - AVI4M

This course focuses on enabling students to refine their use of the creative process when creating and presenting two- and three-dimensional art works using a variety of traditional and emerging media and technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process to deconstruct art works and explore connections between art and society. The studio program enables students to explore a range of materials, processes, and techniques that can be applied in their own art production. Students will also make connections between various works of art in personal, contemporary, historical, and cultural contexts.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: AVI3M

Visual Arts: Cultural/Historical Studies - AP Art History - AWU4MAP Logo
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of art from diverse historical and cultural contexts. Students examine the major forms of artistic expression (architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms) with a major focus on Western Art. Particular focus is placed on the study of Non-Western art from a variety of cultures that allows students an understanding of those cultures and a point of comparison. Students will learn to recognize and analyze works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity through a variety of written and oral forms of communication. Additionally, they will engage in hands-on activities and experiences designed to give students a greater depth of understanding. This course leads to the AP Art History examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Communications Technology - TGJ4M

This course enables students to further develop media knowledge and skills while designing and producing projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. Students may work in the areas of TV, video, and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology, and will investigate career opportunities and challenges in a rapidly changing technological environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: TGJ3M or ASM3M or permission of the instructor with completion of prerequisite summer course work.

Language and Culture

Language and Culture

The Language and Culture Department consists of French, German, Mandarin, Spanish and Arabic. French is a compulsory subject from Middle One to Upper Two (2D or 3U) and students are required to take an additional international language of their choice in Upper One.

A highlight of the program is the Middle Two International Languages course. Students explore a round robin comprised of Mandarin, German, Spanish, and Arabic while also continuing the French program. This introductory program focuses on the cultural aspects of the languages through the use of basic conversational skills.

Exchanges - Students studying modern languages have the exceptional opportunity to participate in language-based exchange programs to Québec, France, Spain, South America, Jordan, China, and Germany. While totally immersing themselves in the language and the culture of the country, students follow a full program of studies at the host school. These exchanges greatly enhance the students’ fluency and comprehension. For more information on exchanges, see the section on International Programs under Academic Program.

Certificates and Diplomas - Appleby offers its students a number of special certificates and diplomas to demonstrate a student’s proficiency in a target language. Further details can be found under Additional Certifications and Qualifications in the Academic Program section of the curriculum guide.

French

Appleby offers two French programs with three streams. In both programs (core / extended), students will increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities. Students in all levels will also develop a variety of skills necessary to become life-long language learners.

Most begin at Middle One and continue through to Senior One/Senior Two. All students are required to study French up to the end of Upper Two. Depending on students' backgrounds and abilities when entering Appleby College, they may be considered into either program: the traditional core program (FSF) with a thorough grounding in French language skills and the extended program (FEF) for students with strong communication skills. When students complete the Grade 12 FEF4U course, they have the option of preparing for the Advanced Placement exam.

The core French program provides two streams: regular or accelerated. In either streams, students develop communication skills, an understanding of how the language functions and a sensitivity to francophone cultures. The program offers a valuable educational experience by encouraging each student to achieve a functional command of French through literature study, grammatical structures and vocabulary. Classes are conducted, as much as possible, in the target language to develop communication skills.

The extended French program gives students the opportunity to further their already strong background in the language. This extended and accelerated program focuses on strengthening communication, written and reading skills and broadening their already profound knowledge of francophone culture. In support of verbal communication, classes are conducted entirely in the target language.

In Middle One, students can also enter into the accelerated stream, in either the Core or the Extended program. Students begin with the equivalent of Grade 7, but quickly move ahead into concepts taken from the Grade 8 curriculum. By Middle Two, these students move into the Grade 9 program and in the following year advance to the Grade 10 equivalent.

In either program, students are encouraged to participate in class and to present assignments, promoting class discussion and interaction. Assessments reflect the emphasis on verbal skills, and concentrate on language use, comprehension and understanding of culture and literature. Textbooks, supplementary readers and other media forms, including those electronically-based, complement and support grammatical and lexical acquisition as well as thematic expansion.

Placement Test: All students who are entering the Ontario or the Canadian education system for the first time will be writing a placement test in order to determine the best course of action.

Middle One Required

Students are placed into one of the following courses.

Core French - FSF7J

This program emphasizes introductory concepts and builds sound foundations through guided learning situations, essential vocabulary and fundamental grammatical structures. Students expand their knowledge by applying their language skills in structured and open-ended oral and written texts, including texts about aspects of culture in diverse French-speaking communities. Both the present and future tenses will serve as the primary reference points for skill development. Students will develop reading strategies to support their understanding of a variety of simple classroom and authentic materials.

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Core French - FSF7J-8J

In the FSF7J-8J course, students begin with the equivalent of Grade 7, but quickly move ahead into concepts taken from the Grade 8 curriculum. It is designed for students entering Middle One who have a solid foundation in French, and have conferenced with a faculty member to support placement in this intensive course. This course emphasizes the development of accurate communication skills through independent-based authentic tasks. The present, future and past tenses are the primary focus for skill development. Students will respond to a variety of short authentic texts and develop reading strategies in order to build their understanding and abilities.

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Extended French - FEF7J-8J

This course gives students the opportunity to build upon and further an already strong background in the language acquired in previous years. It is intended for students who wish to further develop and expand their verbal, written and reading skills. The course represents a stepping stone to future extended courses, which follow a logical academic progression favouring an exposure to a variety of accents and conversational situations, more accurate expression and the development of building blocks essential for advanced study.

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Middle Two Required

Students must select one of the following courses.

Core French - FSF8J

The objective of this course is to continue to build a strong foundation through guided and independent learning situations, focusing on fundamental vocabulary and intermediate grammatical structures. Students expand their knowledge by applying their language skills in structured and open-ended oral and written texts; the past tense is the primary reference point for skill development. Students will continue to develop reading strategies as they read and respond to a variety of short authentic texts.

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: FSF7J or equivalent

Core French - FSF1D8

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate and interact in French with increasing independence, with a focus on familiar topics related to their daily lives. Students will develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing by using language learning strategies introduced in the elementary Core French program, and will apply creative and critical thinking skills in various ways. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 %
Pre-Requisite: FSF7J-8J or FEF7J-8J or equivalent

Extended French - FEF1D

This course provides opportunities for students to speak and interact in French in a variety of real-life and personally relevant contexts. Students will develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing by using language introduced in the elementary Extended French program. They will develop their creative and critical thinking skills, through independently responding to and interacting with a variety of oral and written texts. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: FEF7J-8J or equivalent

Upper One Required

Students must select one of the following courses.

Core French, Open - FSF1O

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no knowledge of French or who have not accumulated the minimum of 600 hours of elementary Core French instruction. Students will begin to understand and speak French in guided and structured interactive settings, and will develop fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through discussing situations and issues that are relevant to their daily lives. Throughout the course, students will develop their awareness of diverse French-speaking communities in Canada and acquire an understanding and appreciation of these communities. They will also develop a variety of skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Core French - FSF1D

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate and interact in French with increasing independence, with a focus on familiar topics related to their daily lives. Students will develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing by using language-learning strategies introduced in the elementary Core French program, and will apply creative and critical thinking skills in various ways. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: FSF8J or equivalent

Core French - FSF2D9

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate in French about personally relevant, familiar, and academic topics in real-life situations with increasing independence. Students will exchange information, ideas, and opinions with others in guided and increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions. Students will continue to develop their language in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. They will also increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: FSF1D or FEF1D or equivalent

Extended French - FEF2D

This course provides extensive opportunities for students to use their communication skills in French and to apply language-learning strategies. Students will develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing by responding to and interacting with French oral and written texts in a variety of real-life contexts, using their creative and critical thinking skills to explore and evaluate information and ideas in the texts. Students will increase their knowledge of the language through the study of French-Canadian authors. They will also increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: FEF1D or equivalent

Upper Two Required

Students must select one of the following courses.

Core French, Open - FSF2O

This course provides opportunities for students to speak French in guided and structured interactive settings. Students will communicate about matters of personal interest and familiar topics through listening, speaking, reading, and writing in real-life situations, using print, oral, visual, and electronic texts. Students will develop a general understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, as well as skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: FSF1O or equivalent

Core French - FSF2D

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate in French about personally relevant, familiar, and academic topics in real-life situations with increasing independence. Students will exchange information, ideas, and opinions with others in guided and increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions. Students will continue to develop their language in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. They will also increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: FSF1D

Core French - FSF3U

This course offers students extended opportunities to speak and interact in real-life situations in French with greater independence. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and exploring a variety of oral and written texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: FSF2D or FEF2D

Core French - FEF3U

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate about concrete and abstract topics in various situations. Students will consolidate and refine their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing by applying language-learning strategies, as well as creative and critical thinking skills, in a variety of real-life contexts. Students will develop their knowledge of the language through the study of contemporary French authors and well-known French European authors. They will deepen their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: FEF2D or equivalent

Senior One Electives

Core French - FSF3U

This course offers students extended opportunities to speak and interact in real-life situations in French with greater independence. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and exploring a variety of oral and written texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: FSF2D

Core French - FSF4U

This course provides extensive opportunities for students to speak and interact in French independently. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, apply language-learning strategies in a wide variety of real-life situations, and develop their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and interacting with a variety of oral and written texts. They will also enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: FSF3U or FEF3U

Extended French - AP French Language and Culture - FEF4U AP Logo

This course further emphasizes the consolidation of communication skills required to interact in French for various purposes about concrete and abstract topics. Students will independently apply language-learning strategies in a variety of real-life and personally relevant contexts in listening, speaking reading and writing, and will broaden their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and analysing oral and written texts. Students will increase their knowledge of the language through the study of Canadian and international French literature. Students will increase their knowledge of the French language through the study of Canadian and international French literature. They will also enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning. This course leads to the AP French Language and Culture examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: FEF3U or equivalent

Extended French - AP French Language and Culture - FEF4U AP Logo

This course further emphasizes the consolidation of communication skills required to interact in French for various purposes about concrete and abstract topics. Students will independently apply language-learning strategies in a variety of real-life and personally relevant contexts in listening, speaking reading and writing, and will broaden their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and analysing oral and written texts. Students will increase their knowledge of the language through the study of Canadian and international French literature. Students will increase their knowledge of the French language through the study of Canadian and international French literature. They will also enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning. This course leads to the AP French Language and Culture examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: FEF3U or equivalent

Senior Two Electives

Core French - FSF4U

This course provides extensive opportunities for students to speak and interact in French independently. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, apply language-learning strategies in a wide variety of real-life situations, and develop their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and interacting with a variety of oral and written texts. They will also enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: FSF3U or FEF3U

Extended French - AP French Language and Culture - FEF4U AP Logo

This course further emphasizes the consolidation of communication skills required to interact in French for various purposes about concrete and abstract topics. Students will independently apply language-learning strategies in a variety of real-life and personally relevant contexts in listening, speaking reading and writing, and will broaden their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and analysing oral and written texts. Students will increase their knowledge of the language through the study of Canadian and international French literature. Students will increase their knowledge of the French language through the study of Canadian and international French literature. They will also enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning. This course leads to the AP French Language and Culture examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: FEF3U or equivalent

International Languages

Middle Two Required

International Languages - LWM8J

This is a rotational course that provides the groundwork for future studies in Arabic, German, Mandarin and Spanish. This introductory program also explores cultural aspects of the aforementioned languages through the use of basic conversational skills. Each segment of the course provides students with a cultural experience, enhanced by a four-component program centered on themes of interest to Middle Two students and their context. From this introductory exposure, students are required to choose one international language to pursue in Upper One at the BD level and are encouraged to continue their study to the completion of the DU credit at the end of Senior One (or Senior Two Year).

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

In Upper One, students choose between Arabic, German, Mandarin or Spanish. In their first year of studying the language, they will explore aspects of the culture of countries or regions where the language is spoken including social customs, food, sports and leisure activities, popular festivals, and music. Although students will expand their vocabulary and knowledge of linguistic elements, the language they will use at this level will still be simple. In their second year, students will enhance their critical and creative thinking skills through reading diverse materials, and will explore a variety of personal and professional contexts in which knowledge of the language is required. In their final year, students will continue to refine and enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the language, with the goal of using these communication skills in a variety of personal, academic, and professional contexts. Native speakers will be placed in a course that is best suited for the language skills and abilities.

Arabic

Language is our principal means of communication. As societies around the world become more closely linked through advances in technology, the ability to communicate in more than one language becomes increasingly important. The Arabic program will allow students to acquire skills in the following four areas listening, speaking, reading and writing, with an emphasis placed on communication and culture. The program uses the modern Arabic (MSA), which is the language used in all contemporary Arabic publications as well as the language of the Arabic broadcast media.

Upper One Elective

International Languages, Level 1 - Arabic - LYABD

This course provides opportunities for students to begin to develop and apply skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Students will communicate and interact in structured activities, with a focus on matters of personal interest and familiar topics, and will read and write simple texts in MSA. Throughout the course, students will acquire an understanding and appreciation of diverse communities in the Arab regions. They will also develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Elective

International Languages, Level 2 - Arabic - LYACU

This course provides opportunities for students to increase their competence and confidence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Students will communicate about academic and personally relevant topics in increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions, and will develop their creative and critical thinking skills through exploring and responding to a variety of oral and written texts. Students will continue to enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities in regions of the world where Arabic is spoken. They will also investigate personal and professional contexts in which knowledge of the language is required, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: LYABD or equivalent

Senior One or Senior Two Elective

International Languages, Level 3 - Arabic - LYADU

This course provides extended opportunities for students to communicate and interact in Arabic in a variety of social and academic contexts. Students will refine and enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills, as they explore and respond to a variety of oral and written texts, including complex authentic and adapted Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities where Arabic is spoken, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: LYACU or equivalent

German

The German language program uses materials allowing for intensive practice of the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It also provides insights into the customs of Germanic countries enabling students to understand and communicate with a native speaker. Students gain a positive attitude towards the language and acquire valuable insight into the function of language in society and its importance as a tool for communication. In order to benefit fully from the program, it is recommended that students remain in the course for two years. In this way, they are further exposed to the language and gain the opportunity to participate in exchanges or summer programs. As part of the PASCH program, Appleby students benefit from a series of events organized in collaboration with the Goethe Institute including exhibitions, poetry readings as well as a yearly scholarship to Germany during the summer.

Upper One Elective

International Languages, Level 1 - German - LWGBD

This course provides opportunities for students to begin to develop and apply skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German. Students will communicate and interact in structured activities, with a focus on matters of personal interest and familiar topics, and will read and write simple texts in German. Throughout the course, students will acquire an understanding and appreciation of diverse communities in regions of the world where German is spoken. They will also develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning including social customs, naming practices, family life and relationships, food, sport, music, popular festivals and celebrations.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Elective

International Languages, Level 2 - German - LWGCU

This course provides opportunities for students to increase their competence and confidence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German. Students will communicate about academic and personally relevant topics in increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions, and will develop their creative and critical thinking skills through exploring and responding to a variety of oral and written texts. Students will continue to enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities in regions of the world where German is spoken. They will also investigate personal and professional contexts in which knowledge of the language is required, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: LWGBD or equivalent

Senior One or Senior Two Elective

International Languages, Level 3 - German - LWGDU

This course provides extended opportunities for students to communicate and interact in German in a variety of social and academic contexts. Students will refine and enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in German, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills, as they explore and respond to a variety of oral and written texts, including complex authentic and adapted texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities where German is spoken, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: LWGCU or equivalent

Mandarin

The Chinese language is spoken by almost one fifth of the world population. As a prominent language of East Asia, Chinese language has greatly influenced the writing systems and vocabulary of the neighboring countries. When Chinese economy continues to grow stronger and stronger, Mandarin has become a very popular foreign language to study by people who envisage travelling or even working in China, Taiwan, or Singapore. Learning this language expands students’ knowledge and understanding of the traditional and modern China. Students will explore both the old and modern China via videos, music, foods, calligraphy, and computer programs for the Mandarin learners.

Upper One Elective

International Languages, Level 1 Mandarin - LKMBD

This course provides opportunities for students to begin to develop and apply skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin. Students will communicate and interact in structured activities, with a focus on matters of personal interest and familiar topics, and will read and write simple texts in the language. Throughout the course, students will acquire an understanding and appreciation of diverse communities in regions of the world where Mandarin is spoken. They will also develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning, including social customs, naming practices, family life and relationships, food, sport, music, popular festivals and celebrations.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Elective

International Languages, Level 2 - Mandarin - LKMCU

This course provides opportunities for students to increase their competence and confidence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin. Students will communicate about academic and personally relevant topics in increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions, and will develop their creative and critical thinking skills through exploring and responding to a variety of oral and written texts in Mandarin. Students will continue to enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities in regions of the world where Mandarin is spoken. They will also investigate personal and professional contexts in which knowledge of the language is required, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: LKMBD or equivalent

Senior One or Senior Two Electives

International Languages, Level 3 - Mandarin - LKMDU

This course provides extended opportunities for students to communicate and interact in Mandarin in a variety of social and academic contexts. Students will refine and enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills, as they explore and respond to a variety of oral and written texts, including complex authentic and adapted texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities where Mandarin is spoken, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: LKMCU or equivalent

International Languages, Level 3 - Mandarin - AP Chinese Language and Culture - LKMDUP AP Logo

This course provides extended opportunities for students to communicate and interact in Mandarin in a variety of social and academic contexts. Students will refine and enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills, as they explore and respond to a variety of oral and written texts, including complex authentic and adapted texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities where Mandarin is spoken, . and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning. This course includes additional topics to prepare students for the AP Chinese Language and Culture examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: LKMCU or equivalent

Spanish

As one of the Romance languages, Spanish is descended from Latin. The Spanish language is not only relevant in the European context, but is also a crucial communication tool in the United States as well as South and Central America. It is of increasing importance in business and trade and is a means to explore a variety of Hispanic cultures all over the world. The Spanish program teaches four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), gradually leading to the complexities of analysis, nuances of the language, and discussions of Hispanic literature.

Upper One Elective

International Languages, Level 1 - Spanish - LWSBD

This course provides opportunities for students to begin to develop and apply skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish. Students will communicate and interact in structured activities, with a focus on matters of personal interest and familiar topics, and will read and write simple texts in Spanish. Throughout the course, students will acquire an understanding and appreciation of diverse communities in regions of the world where Spanish is spoken. They will also develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Elective

International Languages, Level 2 - Spanish - LWSCU

This course provides opportunities for students to increase their competence and confidence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish. Students will communicate about academic and personally relevant topics in increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions, and will develop their creative and critical thinking skills through exploring and responding to a variety of oral and written texts in Spanish. Students will continue to enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities in regions of the world where Spanish is spoken. They will also investigate personal and professional contexts in which knowledge of the language is required, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: LWSBD or equivalent

Senior One or Senior Two Elective

International Languages, Level 3 - Spanish - LWSDU

This course provides extended opportunities for students to communicate and interact in Spanish in a variety of social and academic contexts. Students will refine and enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills, as they explore and respond to a variety of oral and written texts in Spanish, including complex authentic and adapted texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities where Spanish is spoken, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning, including issues related to popular culture, linguistic communities in Canada, literature, history, geography, and the arts.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: LWSCU or equivalent

Social Science

Social Science

The study of Social Sciences is an integral part of the Appleby curriculum. In the early years, classes aim to develop an awareness of the wider community, an imaginative interest in the past and a respect for the relationship between people and their environments. Progressively, the students are introduced to Canadian heritage and geography, religion and spirituality, and a host of optional subjects. Students take courses in geography, history and religion, and can choose electives in accounting, business, economics, philosophy, psychology, law and political science.

Students are taught increasingly sophisticated analytical and critical-thinking skills, with particular emphasis on utilizing modern educational technologies and effective research methods into all levels of study. Social Sciences concern individuals and groups making choices in the context of evolving circumstances and ongoing environmental challenges. In this way, students become empathetic to the complexities of human experience, both past and present. Programs place a particular emphasis on teaching an appreciation for the students' roles and responsibilities in Canadian life and the development of a strong global perspective.

Middle One Required

Social Science - HSC7J

This course blends a study of Canadian history with a study of physical environment geography and human interactions with the environment. In history, students will examine social, political, economic, and legal changes in Canada between 1713 and 1850. They will explore the experiences of different groups in Canada during this period. Students will be introduced to the historical inquiry process and will apply it to investigate different perspectives on issues in eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century Canada, including the shift in power from France to Britain. They will begin to apply the concepts of historical thinking, leading to deeper and more meaningful explorations of life in colonial Canada. In geography, students will explore the physical environment and the ways in which people around the world have responded to it. They will develop an understanding of patterns and relationships of the Earth’s physical features and of the physical processes and human activities. In this grade, students will be introduced to the geographic inquiry process and to the concepts of geographic thinking. They will apply the concept of geographic perspective while investigating the impact of natural events and human activities on the physical environment and also various effects of natural resource extraction/harvesting and use. Students will continue to develop their spatial skills, extracting and analysing information from a variety of sources, including different types of maps and graphs, photographs and digital representations, and geographic information systems (GIS).

Evaluation: Term Work - 100 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Middle Two Required

Social Science - HSC8J

This course blends a study of Canadian history from the 1850s to the beginning of World War I in 1914 with a study of global patterns and human geography. In Grade 8 geography, students will explore the relationship between these features/processes and human settlement patterns around the world. Students will explore the impact of human settlement and land use on the environment, including issues related to human settlement, sustainability, global development and quality of life. Students will study factors that affect economic development and quality of life on a global scale and global inequalities. Students will be introduced to new types of maps and graphs, including scatter graphs and population pyramids. In Grade 8 history, students will examine how social, political, economic, and legal changes in Canada between 1850 and 1914 affected different groups in a diverse and regionally distinct nation. Students will examine the forces that led to Confederation and territorial expansion and of the impact on long-time Canadians, including First Nations, as well as new immigrants. Students will develop their ability to think historically and to apply the historical inquiry process, using both primary and secondary sources to explore the perspectives of groups on issues of concern to Canadians from the mid-nineteenth century to the eve of World War I.

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper One Required

Issues in Canadian Geography - CGC1D

This course examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems and how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Students will explore environmental, economic, and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation options, energy choices, and urban development. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate various geographic issues and to develop possible approaches for making Canada a more sustainable place to live.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Required

Canadian History since World War I - CHC2D

This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Civics and Citizenship - CHV2O5

This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

World Religions and Belief Traditions: Perspectives, Issues and Challenges - HRT3M5

This course provides students with opportunities to explore various world religions and belief traditions. Students will develop knowledge of the terms and concepts relevant to this area of study, will examine the ways in which religions and belief traditions meet various human needs, and will learn about the relationship between belief and action. They will examine sacred writings and teachings, consider how concepts of time and place influence different religions and belief traditions, and develop research and inquiry skills related to the study of human expressions of belief.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Required

Students must select at least one of the following options.

Canadian and World Issues: A Geographic Analysis - AP Human Geography - CGW4U AP Logo

In this course, students will address the challenge of creating a more sustainable and equitable world. They will explore issues involving a wide range of topics, including economic disparities, threats to the environment, globalization, human rights, and quality of life, and will analyse government policies, international agreements, and individual responsibilities relating to them. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including the use of spatial technologies, to investigate these complex issues and their impacts on natural and human communities around the world. This course leads to the AP Human Geography examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: HRT3M5

Challenge and Change in Society - HSB4U

This course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behavior and their impact on society. Students will critically analyze how and why cultural, social and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyse causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methodologies can be used to study social change.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: HRT3M5

The Environment and Resource Management - CGR4M

This course investigates interactions between natural and human systems, with a particular emphasis on the impacts of human activity on ecosystems and natural processes. Students will use the geographic inquiry process, apply the concepts of geographic thinking, and employ a variety of spatial skills and technologies to analyse these impacts and propose ways of reducing them. In the course of their investigations, they will assess resource management and sustainability practices, as well as related government policies and international accords. They will also consider questions of individual responsibility and environmental stewardship as they explore ways of developing a more sustainable relationship with the environment.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: HRT3M5

Canada: History, Identity, Culture - AP United States History - CHI4U AP Logo

This course traces the history of Canada, with a focus on the evolution of our national identity and culture as well as the identity and culture of various groups that make up Canada. Students will explore various developments and events, both national and international, from precontact to the present, and will examine various communities in Canada and how they have contributed to identity and heritage in Canada. Students will investigate the development of culture and identity, including national identity, in Canada and North America, and how and why they have changed throughout history. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate the people, events, and forces that have shaped Canada and North America. The course leads to the AP United States History examination, with additional course work and preparation. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: HRT3M5

Senior One Electives

Financial Accounting Fundamentals - BAF3M

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and a merchandising business, computerized accounting, financial analysis, and ethics and current issues in accounting.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals - BOH4M

This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Students will analyze the role of leader in business, with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics, workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills, ethics and social responsiblity are also emphasized.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

International Service Co-op - HSB4U-C

International Service Projects include construction, environmental and social development projects, at the same time as providing exposure to a new community and culture; students learn valuable skills for adaptation and meaningful contribution. Students completing an International Service Project in their Senior One year are able to combine the experience with one of the compulsory Senior One Social Science courses and complete a co-op credit. The International Service Co-op credit includes integration of an action research assignment connecting their international service project experience to their academic course work.

Evaluation: International Service Project Placement - 50 % Social Science Coursework – 25% Academically Focused Assignment – 15% Personal Reflections – 10% 
Pre-Requisite: None

International Service Co-op - HSB4U-C

International Service Projects include construction, environmental and social development projects, at the same time as providing exposure to a new community and culture; students learn valuable skills for adaptation and meaningful contribution. Students completing an International Service Project in their Senior One year are able to combine the experience with one of the compulsory Senior One Social Science courses and complete a co-op credit. The International Service Co-op credit includes integration of an action research assignment connecting their international service project experience to their academic course work.

Evaluation: International Service Project Placement - 50 % Social Science Coursework – 25% Academically Focused Assignment – 15% Personal Reflections – 10% 
Pre-Requisite: None

International Service Co-op - CHI4U-C

International Service Projects include construction, environmental and social development projects, at the same time as providing exposure to a new community and culture; students learn valuable skills for adaptation and meaningful contribution. Students completing an International Service Project in their Senior One year are able to combine the experience with one of the compulsory Senior One Social Science courses and complete a co-op credit. The International Service Co-op credit includes integration of an action research assignment connecting their international service project experience to their academic course work.

Evaluation: International Service Project Placement - 50 % Social Science Coursework – 25% Academically Focused Assignment – 15% Personal Reflections – 10% 
Pre-Requisite: None

International Service Co-op - CGR4M-C

International Service Projects include construction, environmental and social development projects, at the same time as providing exposure to a new community and culture; students learn valuable skills for adaptation and meaningful contribution. Students completing an International Service Project in their Senior One year are able to combine the experience with one of the compulsory Senior One Social Science courses and complete a co-op credit. The International Service Co-op credit includes integration of an action research assignment connecting their international service project experience to their academic course work.

Evaluation: International Service Project Placement - 50 % Social Science Coursework – 25% Academically Focused Assignment – 15% Personal Reflections – 10% 
Pre-Requisite: None

International Service - Co-op - CGW4U-C

International Service Projects include construction, environmental and social development projects, at the same time as providing exposure to a new community and culture; students learn valuable skills for adaptation and meaningful contribution. Students completing an International Service Project in their Senior One year are able to combine the experience with one of the compulsory Senior One Social Science courses and complete a co-op credit. The International Service Co-op credit includes integration of an action research assignment connecting their international service project experience to their academic course work.

Evaluation: International Service Project Placement - 50 % Social Science Coursework – 25% Academically Focused Assignment – 15% Personal Reflections – 10% 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior Two Electives

Analysing Current Economic Issues - AP Macroeconomics - CIA4U AP Logo

This course examines current Canadian and international economic issues, developments, policies, and practices from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the decisions that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in response to economic issues such as globalization, trade agreements, economic inequalities, regulation, and public spending. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, as well as economic models and theories, to investigate, and develop informed opinions about, economic trade-offs, growth, and sustainability and related economic issues. This course leads to the AP Macroeconomics examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination schedule in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

Canadian and International Politics - CPW4U

This course explores various perspectives on issues in Canadian and world politics. Students will explore political decision making and ways in which individuals, stakeholder groups, and various institutions, including governments, multinational corporations, and non-governmental organizations, respond to and work to address domestic and international issues. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate issues, events, and developments of national and international political importance, and to develop and communicate informed opinions about them.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

 

Canadian and International Politics - CPW4U

This course explores various perspectives on issues in Canadian and world politics. Students will explore political decision making and ways in which individuals, stakeholder groups, and various institutions, including governments, multinational corporations, and non-governmental organizations, respond to and work to address domestic and international issues. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate issues, events, and developments of national and international political importance, and to develop and communicate informed opinions about them.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

Canadian and International Law - CLN4U

This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of Canadian and international law and of issues related to human rights and freedoms, conflict resolution, and criminal, environmental, and workplace law, both in Canada and internationally. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal studies inquiry process, and will develop legal reasoning skills, when investigating these and other issues in both Canadian and international contexts.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

International Business Fundamentals- BBB4M

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for post-secondary programs in business, including international business, marketing and management.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

Canadian and International Law - CLN4U

This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of Canadian and international law and of issues related to human rights and freedoms, conflict resolution, and criminal, environmental, and workplace law, both in Canada and internationally. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal studies inquiry process, and will develop legal reasoning skills, when investigating these and other issues in both Canadian and international contexts.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

International Business Fundamentals- BBB4M

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for post-secondary programs in business, including international business, marketing and management.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

Financial Accounting Principles - BAT4M

This course introduces students to advanced accounting principles that will prepare them for post-secondary studies in business. Students will learn about financial statements for various forms of business ownership and how those statements are interpreted in making business decisions. This course expands students’ knowledge of sources of financing, further develops accounting methods for assets, and introduces accounting for partnerships and corporations.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: BAF3M

Human Development throughout the Lifespan - AP Psychology - HHG4M AP Logo

This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of human development throughout the lifespan. Students will learn about a range of theoretical perspectives on human development. They will examine threats to healthy development as well as protective factors that promote resilience. Students will learn about physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development from the prenatal period through old age and will develop their research and inquiry skills by investigating issues related to human development. This course leads to the AP Psychology. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

Financial Accounting Principles - BAT4M

This course introduces students to advanced accounting principles that will prepare them for post-secondary studies in business. Students will learn about financial statements for various forms of business ownership and how those statements are interpreted in making business decisions. This course expands students’ knowledge of sources of financing, further develops accounting methods for assets, and introduces accounting for partnerships and corporations.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: BAF3M

Human Development throughout the Lifespan - AP Psychology - HHG4M AP Logo

This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of human development throughout the lifespan. Students will learn about a range of theoretical perspectives on human development. They will examine threats to healthy development as well as protective factors that promote resilience. Students will learn about physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development from the prenatal period through old age and will develop their research and inquiry skills by investigating issues related to human development. This course leads to the AP Psychology. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

Classical Civilization - LVV4U

This course introduces students to the rich cultural legacy of the classical world. Students will investigate aspects of classical culture, including mythology, literature, art, architecture, philosophy, science, and technology, as well as elements of the ancient Greek and Latin languages. Students will develop creative and critical thinking skills through exploring and responding to works by classical authors in English translation and examining material culture brought to light through archaeology. They will also increase their communication and research skills by working both collaboratively and independently, and will acquire an understanding and appreciation of the interconnectedness of ancient and modern societies.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ENG2D or International Languages, Level 2

Philosophy: Questions and Theories - HZT4U

This course enables students to acquire an understanding of the nature of philosophy and philosophical reasoning skills and to develop and apply their knowledge and skills while exploring specialized branches of philosophy (the course will cover at least three of the following branches: metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, philosophy of science, social and political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they formulate and evaluate arguments related to a variety of philosophical questions and theories. They will also develop research and inquiry skills related to the study and practice of philosophy.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

Philosophy: Questions and Theories - HZT4U

This course enables students to acquire an understanding of the nature of philosophy and philosophical reasoning skills and to develop and apply their knowledge and skills while exploring specialized branches of philosophy (the course will cover at least three of the following branches: metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, philosophy of science, social and political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they formulate and evaluate arguments related to a variety of philosophical questions and theories. They will also develop research and inquiry skills related to the study and practice of philosophy.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science credit

World History since the Fifteenth Century - AP World History - CHY4U AP Logo

This course traces major developments and events in world history since approximately 1450. Students will explore social, economic, and political changes, the historical roots of contemporary issues, and the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate key issues and ideas and assess societal progress or decline in world history. This course leads to the AP World History examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science Credit

World History since the Fifteenth Century - AP World History - CHY4U AP Logo

This course traces major developments and events in world history since approximately 1450. Students will explore social, economic, and political changes, the historical roots of contemporary issues, and the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate key issues and ideas and assess societal progress or decline in world history. This course leads to the AP World History examination. Some additional course work may be required. Students are encouraged to write this Advanced Placement examination scheduled in May.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: Senior One Social Science Credit

Guidance

Guidance

The Guidance program is integrated into the Appleby College Community Life Block and Advisor Program at all grade levels. These courses are delivered to students, in their advisor groupings, giving them an additional time each week to meet and connect with their fellow advisees and advisors. Students participate in a range of discussions and activities designed to promote positive self-image, healthy interpersonal relationships, mindfulness, and emotional well-being.

Each guidance course deals with a broad spectrum of issues focusing on personal growth, self-determination, character education, learning strategies, and positive emotions. Students develop an understanding of the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviour, as well as developing the ability to advocate for themselves and others, to manage emotions, and reason through choices.

Guidance courses are non-credit, but are mandatory at all grade levels. The Grade 10 Career Studies course is an OSSD requirement and is the only one half-credit academic course in the Guidance program. Optional Guidance Courses are available in S1 fo2018-r those students interested in applying to universities in the US and UK.

Middle One Required

Guidance - GLS7X

This non-credit course focuses on developing skills and work habits to foster a smooth transition into Middle School. Topics in the Middle One guidance curriculum include character education, empathy, organization, time management and study skills, and exam preparation. The course is delivered to students in their Home Form Advisor groups giving them time to consider the topics covered and connect with their fellow advisees and Home Form Advisor.

Pre-Requisite: None

Middle Two Required

Guidance - GLS8X

This non-credit course continues to emphasize the development of skills, attitudes and habits which ensure academic, personal and social success. This course is designed to help prepare students for their transition into secondary school. Topics covered include organization, time management, character education, social pressures, study skills, learning types, and stress management. This course is delivered to students in their Home Form Advisor groups giving them time to consider the topics covered and connect with their fellow advisees and Home Form Advisor.

Pre-Requisite: None

Upper One Required

Guidance - GLS1X

The Upper One Guidance curriculum has two main goals: to nurture student connectedness and positivity and to build organization and study skills as they transition to high school. Building positive relationships is paramount to student success. The course is delivered to students in their advisor groupings giving them an additional time each week to meet and connect with their fellow Advisees and Advisor. Students are asked to reflect on school life, in addition to challenges they face as they adjust to high school. Guidance counsellors facilitate conversations around their experience at the school and help support them as needed. Components of Character Education are woven through the course to encourage students to be kind and respectful members of the Appleby community. The second goal is to build student capacity to handle a busy academic and co-curricular schedule. This involves introducing support tools such as the online study planner as well as instruction on organizing emails and tasks. Health and Wellness components including mindfulness and relaxation strategies are also used as an example of how to manage the busy and exciting world of Appleby. In the spring, counsellors will guide students through the course selection process.

Pre-Requisite: None

Upper One Elective - by recommendation only 

Learning Strategies- GLS1O

This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become better, more independent learners. Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community. The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70% Summative Evaluation - 30% 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Required

This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become better, more independent learners. Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community. The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond. Evaluation: Term Work - 70% Summative Evaluation - 30% Pre-Requisite: None

Guidance - GLS2X

The Upper Two guidance curriculum brings together topics from character education, health and wellness, learning strategies and career studies. Upper Two students discover the importance of being able to identify and exercise their own Character Strengths as well as those in their advisor group. Students work to identify ways to use these strengths to contribute to the Appleby community and the world beyond. Learning strategies for staying organized, managing academic and co-curricular tasks as well as exam preparation skills are highlighted throughout the year. A guest faculty speaker series offers students the opportunity to hear about unique career path experiences and is aimed to spark interest in post-secondary possibilities. Students come together in team building activities working in advisor groups to prepare for Upper Two Service Day where they have the opportunity to show collaboration and leadership skills. In the spring counsellors will guide students through the course selection process.

Pre-Requisite: None

Career Studies - GLC2O5

This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work, and community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills, and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course explores postsecondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Guidance - GLS2X

The Upper Two guidance curriculum brings together topics from character education, health and wellness, learning strategies and career studies. Upper Two students discover the importance of being able to identify and exercise their own Character Strengths as well as those in their advisor group. Students work to identify ways to use these strengths to contribute to the Appleby community and the world beyond. Learning strategies for staying organized, managing academic and co-curricular tasks as well as exam preparation skills are highlighted throughout the year. A guest faculty speaker series offers students the opportunity to hear about unique career path experiences and is aimed to spark interest in post-secondary possibilities. Students are introduced to standardized testing when all of them write the PSAT. Students come together in team building activities working in advisor groups to prepare for Upper Two Service Day where they have the opportunity to show collaboration and leadership skills. In the spring counsellors will guide students through the course selection process.

Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Elective - by recommendation only

Career Studies - GLC2O5

This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work, and community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills, and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course explores postsecondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Learning Strategies- GLS1O

This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become better, more independent learners. Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community. The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70% Summative Evaluation - 30% 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Required

Learning Strategies- GLS1O

This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become better, more independent learners. Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community. The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70% Summative Evaluation - 30% 
Pre-Requisite: None

Guidance - GLU3X

The Senior One Guidance course is focused on post-secondary exploration and research. Students are challenged to consider their motivation for pursuing post-secondary education and to identify potential programs of interest. Students research programs in their fields of interest to become more informed about the admission process. They are also guided through a process of identifying what they feel are important factors and characteristics in any school they apply to. Students critically consider what action steps they must take in order to be competitive applicants for admission. Topics in this course include university research, self-reflection, their marketing strategy, standardized tests (including having all students write the PSAT), the application process, writing admission and scholarship essays, enrichment opportunities, and determining their next steps leading into their Senior Two year.

Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Electives

Guidance - GLU3X

The Senior One Guidance course is focused on post-secondary exploration and research. Students are challenged to consider their motivation for pursuing post-secondary education and to identify potential programs of interest. Students research programs in their fields of interest to become more informed about the admission process. They are also guided through a process of identifying what they feel are important factors and characteristics in any school they apply to. Students critically consider what action steps they must take in order to be competitive applicants for admission. Topics in this course include university research, self-reflection, their marketing strategy, standardized tests, the application process, writing admission and scholarship essays, enrichment opportunities, and determining their next steps leading into their Senior Two year.

Pre-Requisite: None

US Guidance - GUS3X

This elective, non-credit class is directed to students in Senior One who are interested in applying to American universities; student learn about the various aspects involved in the application process for US Colleges and Universities. The topics covered include; a new vocabulary required for US applications, the underlying principles of ‘Holistic Review’ in the admissions process, standardized testing, understanding an applicant’s profile, the Common Application including its components and requirements, researching schools, and requirements of the application essay and interview. The class meets once a week during either lunch period; lunch is provided during this ‘lunch and learn’ class. US Guidance is essential for any student considering applying to a US institution.

Pre-Requisite: None

UK Guidance - GUK3X

This elective, non-credit course is directed to students in Senior One who are interested in applying to universities in the United Kingdom. Students learn about the various aspects involved in the application process. The topics include: the application process, UCAS, admissions testing, writing the personal statement, researching programs and schools, and requirements of the application. UK Guidance is essential for any student considering applying to the UK.

Pre-Requisite: None

US Guidance - GUS3X

This elective, non-credit class is directed to students in Senior One who are interested in applying to American universities; student learn about the various aspects involved in the application process for US Colleges and Universities. The topics covered include; a new vocabulary required for US applications, the underlying principles of ‘Holistic Review’ in the admissions process, standardized testing, understanding an applicant’s profile, the Common Application including its components and requirements, researching schools, and requirements of the application essay and interview. The class meets once a week during either lunch period; lunch is provided during this ‘lunch and learn’ class. US Guidance is essential for any student considering applying to a US institution.

Pre-Requisite: None

Senior Two Required

UK Guidance - GUK3X

This elective, non-credit course is directed to students in Senior One who are interested in applying to universities in the United Kingdom. Students learn about the various aspects involved in the application process. The topics include: the application process, UCAS, admissions testing, writing the personal statement, researching programs and schools, and requirements of the application. UK Guidance is essential for any student considering applying to the UK.

Pre-Requisite: None

Guidance - GLU4X

The Senior Two guidance course focuses on supporting students with their post-secondary applications as well as preparing them for their transition to college or university. Building from the research completed in Senior One, students finalize their list of post-secondary programs and schools they will apply to, complete the application and explore scholarship opportunities. Students have individual meetings with the guidance counsellors so they can be supported as they go through the process of deciding which program and school is best suited for them and develop self-advocacy skills. In addition to the core meeting times, students are provided with application workshops, university liaison presentations, and guest lectures aimed at supporting them with their research, completing the application and preparing for the transition to university.

Pre-Requisite: None

Health and Physical Education

Health and Physical Education

The Health and Physical Education Department is a synthesis of Physical Education, Health Education and Outdoor Education.

Physical Education plays a major role in the development of the complete individual. The aim of the Health and Physical Education department is to ensure students have healthy minds and bodies. Health and Physical Education gives students a platform with which to develop lifelong health and fitness learning.

Students are provided with opportunities to improve their personal fitness and movement competencies, while simultaneously developing an understanding of healthy living principles. Students are encouraged to develop and maintain a high level of physical fitness and a healthy active lifestyle, developing values and social skills consistent with Appleby College’s philosophy. In the early years, students develop their gross and fine motor skills through a variety of team games, aquatics, dual and individual sports. Selected activities reinforce present and future leisure values and provide opportunity for self-expression, enjoyment and skill development. Students develop social skills and attitudes including independence, responsibility, leadership, co-operation, sportsmanship and an appreciation of the capabilities and limitations of self and others. Age-appropriate health topics are studied in each course.

Students enjoy access to Appleby College's athletic facilities including the playing fields, gymnasium, climbing wall, squash courts, tennis courts, weight training room, cardio room, pool and arena. Health and Physical Education is a compulsory course for Middle One to Upper One students.

The Outdoor Education program is an experiential-based approach to self-discovery, leadership and environmental mindfulness. The program is mandatory in Middle One, Middle Two, Upper One and Upper Two. The program emphasis is on outdoor skills, fitness and leadership skills, which complement and enrich the students’ Health and Physical Education curriculum.

Middle One Required

Healthy Active Living Education - PED7J

The expectations for Middle one health and physical education build on the students’ experiences from Grade 6 and further develop the knowledge and skills they need for movement competency. No longer children but not yet adults, adolescents are beginning to face life decisions that may have major consequences for them as well as others. Their lives are changing rapidly, and they need more advanced knowledge and skills to understand and cope with the changes they are experiencing and to make responsible decisions about their health. As they grow into their adult bodies, they have the opportunity to establish patterns of healthy, active living that will benefit them throughout their lives.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Middle Two Required

Healthy Active Living Education - PED8J

The expectations for Middle two health and physical education build on the students’ experiences from Middle one and further develop the knowledge and skills they need for movement competency. No longer children but not yet adults, adolescents are beginning to face life decisions that may have major consequences for them as well as others. Their lives are changing rapidly, and they need more advanced knowledge and skills to understand and cope with the changes they are experiencing and to make responsible decisions about their health. As they grow into their adult bodies, they have the opportunity to establish patterns of healthy, active living that will benefit them throughout their lives.

Evaluation: Term Work - 85 % Summative Evaluation - 15 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper One Required

Healthy Active Living Education - PPL1O

This course equips students with the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities, students develop knowledge and skills related to movement competence and personal fitness that provide a foundation for active living. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Upper Two Elective

Healthy Active Living Education - PPL2O

This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities, students develop knowledge and skills related to movement competence and personal fitness that provide a foundation for active living. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Healthy Living and Personal and Fitness Activities - PAF2O

This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities, students develop knowledge and skills related to movement competence and personal fitness that provide a foundation for active living. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively. While considering the material using an individual fitness focus, students will further develop their personal fitness pursuits through acquiescence of training skills through resistance and weight training, cardiovascular fitness, pilates, yoga and spinning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior One Electives

Healthy Active Living Education - PPL3O

This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities, students develop knowledge and skills related to movement competence and personal fitness that provide a foundation for active living. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Healthy Living and Personal and Fitness Activities - PAF3O

This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities, students develop knowledge and skills related to movement competence and personal fitness that provide a foundation for active living. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively. Building on previous experiences in the area of conditioning, students will focus on their personal fitness pursuits through acquiescence of training skills through resistance and weight training, cardiovascular fitness, pilates, yoga and spinning.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Recreation and Healthy Active Living Leadership - PLF4MN

This course enables students to explore the benefits of lifelong participation in active recreation and healthy leisure and to develop the leadership and coordinating skills needed to plan, organize, and safely implement recreational events and other activities related to healthy, active living. Students will also learn how to promote the benefits of healthy, active living to others through mentoring and assisting them in making informed decisions that enhance their well-being. In addition, they are given opportunities to explore the fundamentals of outdoor leadership through applying problem-solving processes, group dynamics, outdoor skills, nutrition and concepts of their personal well-being. Students will apply and practice many of the course theories during outdoor education trips with the Middle One, Middle Two and Upper Two grades. These experiences provide an array of opportunities for self-learning, leadership development and environmental awareness. The course is designed to prepare students for university programs in physical education and health and kinesiology as well as college and university programs in recreation and leisure management, fitness and health promotion, and fitness leadership.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: Any health and physical education course.

Recreation and Heathy Active Living Leadership - PLF4MR

This course enables students to explore the benefits of lifelong participation in active recreation and healthy leisure and to develop the leadership and coordinating skills needed to plan, organize, and safely implement recreational events and other activities related to healthy, active living. Students will also learn how to promote the benefits of healthy, active living to others through mentoring and assisting them in making informed decisions that enhance their well-being. In addition, they are given opportunities to develop personal leadership skills through practical and experiential applications relevant to the school and local community. The course will prepare students for university programs in physical education and health and kinesiology and for college and university programs in recreation and leisure management, fitness and health promotion, and fitness leadershipEvaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % Pre-Requisites: Any health and physical education course

Senior Two Electives

Introductory Kinesiology - PSK4UF

This course focuses on the study of human movement and of systems, factors, and principles involved in human development. Students will learn about the effects of physical activity on health and performance, the evolution of physical activity and sport, and the physiological, psychological, and social factors that influence an individual’s participation in physical activity and sport. The course prepares students for university programs in physical education and health, kinesiology, health sciences, health studies, recreation, and sports administration.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: Any senior level Health and physical education course or any senior level Science.

Introductory Kinesiology - Outdoor Education - PSK4UN

This course focuses on the study of human movement and of systems, factors, and principles involved in human development. Students will learn about the effects of physical activity on health and performance, the evolution of physical activity and sport, and the physiological, psychological, and social factors that influence an individual’s participation in physical activity and sport. The course prepares students for university programs in physical education and health, kinesiology, health sciences, health studies, recreation, and sports administration. Students will further develop and enhance the outdoor leadership skills learned in the Recreation and Healthy Active Living Leadership course. Students will apply and practice many of the course theories as they assist in planning an implementation of a six-day winter skills trip, as well as co-lead an additional six-day winter camping trip for the Upper Two students. The final summative assessment for this course is the complete organization, implementation of, and participation in, a six-day canoe trip in late May or early June.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: PLF4MN or permission of the instructor

Healthy Living and Personal and Fitness Activities - PAF4O

This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices. It places special emphasis on how students can maintain the habits of healthy, active living throughout their lives as they make the transition to adulthood and independent living. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities in a variety of settings, students can enhance their movement competence, personal fitness, and confidence. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively. The main focus of this course is on individual fitness and developing and implementing a personal fitness plan; with a long term outlook on developing personal fitness goals and the skills and knowledge to become lifelong active learners.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: None

Outdoor Education/Northward Bound

Appleby College’s Outdoor Education program strives to introduce and immerse our students into a total experiential learning environment. Leadership and outdoor education are the structural components of the experience-based curriculum that lend to the enrichment of our student body, faculty and community. Vital life skills such as, self-confidence, understanding relationships, personal growth and a dedicated responsibility toward our local and global communities, as well as our planet, are developed by using the medium of the out-of-doors. Challenging our students in settings and situations inherent to the program’s activities provides the opportunities to practice these skills under the guidance of qualified instructors. Activities include high-ropes, rock-climbing, canoe tripping, wilderness living and navigation, leadership training, environmental awareness, and winter camping. A delivered balance between technical knowledge and direct experiences is introduced in order to strengthen and develop each student’s future endeavours. Participation in the Upper One Fall trip and the Upper Two Winter trips are required components of the Appleby College Diploma.

Upper One Required

Upper One Outdoor Education - PPL1N

The Upper One Outdoor Education trips occur in autumn at Appleby’s McLaughlin Northern Campus, Lake Temagami. Students are scheduled into three, one-week blocks where they will spend the time immersed in an exciting outdoor education program. The main component of their trip consists of a three-day, two-night canoe trip to some of Ontario’s more picturesque lakes. Many of these small lakes are only accessible by portaging one’s canoe or by float plane. Within a challenging outdoor environment, an experiential approach is taken towards developing each student’s awareness and understanding of problem-solving processes, group dynamics, and concepts of well-being. Students learn and practice the skills and principles necessary to improve their own and others’ quality of life, and make choices associated with increasing personal responsibility within their own lifestyles. During the outdoor adventure, students are exposed to tremendous learning opportunities, designed to enhance communication, leadership, personal and social skills. The Upper One students are accompanied by their advisor on the trip. The focus is to enhance the connection between the student, advisor and the advisor group as a whole. Individuals will spend valuable time with their group and with their advisor, helping to develop and strengthen the relationship and trust, as a foundation for their partnership during the course of students' careers at Appleby College.

Upper Two Outdoor Education - PPL2N

Each winter, Upper Two students are required to participate in a six-day trip to Appleby’s McLaughlin Northern Campus - Rabbitnose Island, Temagami. Throughout the experience, students will receive instruction in a variety of winter wilderness skills. Snowshoeing, wilderness navigation with map and compass, outdoor cooking and camping skills are focuses of the instruction. Emphasis is placed on the responsibility that each individual has to self-care as well as the importance of a team. Groups will be guided by Senior One and Two Outdoor Leaders as well as hired facilitators. It is this leadership team that transfers the knowledge and skills associated with the outdoors. The trip consists of a three-day, two-night outing. During this time students will travel by snowshoe, carrying their gear on their backs and in pulks (pull toboggans), navigate through the wilderness, set up an efficient camp, cook over open fires and spend two nights sleeping in a quinzhee (snow shelter), they themselves will build. This is an experience like no other, and further develops and builds upon the wilderness camping and leadership skills introduced in the Upper One program.

Pre-Requisites: None

eLearn

eLearn Courses

eLearning Consortium Canada (ELCC) is a community of independent school educators dedicated to innovation and 21st Century learning. In addition to offering exemplary online Ontario credit courses to students in partner schools, ELCC aims to be a leader in providing digital fluency skills to its teachers with ongoing professional development opportunities. Using pedagogical best practices and the principle of sustainability, ELCC aims to provide an enhanced online experience for grades 9 – 12 students across Canada.

As a member of ELCC, Appleby has approved a number of the eLearning courses for our students. The following exceptions apply. An Appleby student may not replace a required Appleby course with an online equivalent. For example in Senior One all students carry at least one Mathematics course. This could not be replaced by an online course but a second Mathematics course could be taken online. Students can carry up to one online course to meet the minimum number of courses for Senior One. For Senior Two students, no more than one online course can be taken to meet the minimum requirement.

All students interested in taking an e-Learn course will need to meet with Guidance to attain approval and to add the course to their selections.

Senior One Elective

Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, & Sociology Online Course - HSP3Ue

This course provides students with opportunities to think critically about theories, questions, and issues related to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the approaches and research methods used by social scientists. They will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science research, and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues within the three disciplines.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: The Grade 10 academic course in English, or the Grade 10 academic history course (Canadian and World Studies)

Environmental Science Online Course - SVN3Me

This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge of, and skills relating to, environmental science that will help them succeed in life after secondary school. Students will explore a range of topics, including the role of science in addressing contemporary environmental challenges; the impact of the environment on human health; sustainable agriculture and forestry; the reduction and management of waste; and the conservation of energy. Students will increase their scientific and environmental literacy and examine the interrelationships between science, the environment, and society in a variety of areas.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: SNC2D

Communications Technology Online Course - TGJ3Me

This course examines communications technology from a media perspective. Students will develop knowledge and skills as they design and produce media projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. These areas may include TV, video, and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues, and will explore college and university programs and career opportunities in the various communications technology fields. Students will use the technology skills in this course to create a variety of marketing and advertising materials and will engage in marketing theories and principles as they relate to a business context.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

Senior Two Elective

Earth and Space Science Online Course - SES4Ue

This course develops students’ understanding of the Earth and its place in the universe. Students will investigate the properties of and forces in the universe and solar system and analyse techniques scientists use to generate knowledge about them. Students will examine the Earth's place in the solar system and, after a general introduction to Earth science, will explore in more detail the materials of the Earth, its processes, and its history. Throughout the course, students will learn how these forces, processes, and material affect their daily lives The course draws on astronomy, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics in its consideration of geological processes that can be observed directly or inferred from other evidence.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: Science, Grade 10, Academic

Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals Online Course - BOH4Me

This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Students will analyse the role of a leader in business with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics, workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills, ethics, and social responsibility will be emphasized throughout the course.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: None

The Writer’s Craft Online Course - EWC4Ue

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students will analyze models of effective writing; use a workshop approach to produce a range of works; identify and use techniques required for specialized forms of writing; and identify effective ways to improve the quality of their writing. They will also complete a major paper as part of a creative or analytic independent study project and investigate opportunities for publication and writing careers.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisite: ENG3U

Classical Civilization Online Course - LVV4Ue

This course allows students to explore the beliefs and achievements of the classical world, which have shaped Western thought and civilization. Students will investigate such aspects of classical culture as its mythology, art, literature, and philosophy, as well as elements of ancient Greek and Latin, through a variety of activities such as dramatizations, audio-visual presentations, and discussions. By reading classical authors in English and examining archaeological evidence, students will enhance both their communication skills and their ability to think critically and creatively.

Evaluation: Term Work - 70 % Summative Evaluation - 30 % 
Pre-Requisites: English, Grade 10

Co-curricular Program

Co-curricular Program

Co-curricular Selection

Appleby's Co-curricular Program develops the whole student, through a strong academic curriculum and required participation in athletics, arts, service and residential life programs. Appleby broadens the experiences of its students through a comprehensive co-curricular program. The school ensures each student encounters valuable experiences in all these areas, providing a solid foundation for life beyond the Appleby gates. Students learn to appreciate a wide variety of activities, and are exposed to experiences they may not have otherwise considered.


Co-curricular Selection

All students select co-curricular options at the beginning of each co-curricular season (Fall, Winter and Spring). The final deadline for changing these options is two weeks following the start of each new season. All offerings in the co-curricular program are subject to sufficient enrolment. Students will be notified by the school in the case of a choice not being offered to allow selection of another program.

Exemptions

The requirements for each school level are outlined in the following sections. There may be special circumstances where a student may ask for an alternative plan. Several examples follow:

  • The exemption from a program to pursue a program not offered by the school.
  • A term off the co-curricular program to pursue a high-level program outside the school (this may not be done during the reporting period in which the same program is offered by the school).
  • To get an exemption for a sport, the student must represent the school in that sport.

Exemption forms are emailed to students the beginning of September or may be requested from the Assistant Head of School, Co-Curriculars Programs. Complete details of the alternative activity are required including hours, place and name of the external supervisor. The committee will review any requests and will respond before the start of the school year. Exemption forms are also considered two weeks before the commencement of a new term of co-curricular activities. Students should fill out the form completely and email it to the Assistant Head of School, Co-curricular Programs. Exemptions must be approved before students can stop attending their Appleby co-curricular activity.

If a student wishes to do all Athletics (competitive teams only) in Upper One to Senior Two they must meet with the Assistant Head of School, Co-curriculars Programs and if they meet the requirements they will be given special permission to not complete their two terms of arts or service.

Awards

Outstanding student achievement in the co-curricular program is recognized through special awards. Colours are awarded each reporting period to students who demonstrate outstanding performance and leadership in competitive arts or athletics. Students are nominated by their faculty supervisor and are presented with a Colours tie and permitted to wear the Colours jacket.

Service Pins are awarded to students who have shown an outstanding dedication to Appleby's Service program. Students are nominated by the Director of Service or their faculty supervisors.

The criteria for being awarded Colours are as follows:

  • Arts Colours: Colours are awarded to students who demonstrate outstanding performance and leadership in the arts. Colours winners model commitment, positive participation and enthusiasm for the activity as well as demonstrate outstanding performance skills.  Students winning colours in the arts exhibit proactive initiative as well as leadership and collaboration abilities and they motivate and inspire those around them.

  • Athletics Colours: Colours are awarded to students who demonstrate outstanding performance and leadership in competitive athletics. Students winning colours in athletics distinguish themselves among their teammates by making an extraordinary contribution to the overall success of their team. Athletes recognized as colours winners have demonstrated initiative and support their teammates' efforts. Colours recipients have been positive role models in their team and motivate others to perform to the best of their ability. These students are outstanding ambassadors for their team and Appleby athletics as a whole.

  • Service Pins: Service pins are awarded to students who demonstrate a unique understanding of the needs of the people that they have assisted. These students have formed a genuine bond with the service recipients and they have made a direct impact on their lives. These students have an impeccable attendance record and they have worked seamlessly with agency representatives where they are volunteering. Students receiving a service pin have demonstrated leadership skills by encouraging their peers to see the value in service and by supporting their service initiatives. These students have developed unique ways to add value to the program. They are reliable, committed, positive and approachable. They are outstanding ambassadors for Appleby College and the community.

Middle School

Middle School Co-curriculars

Middle School students are introduced to Appleby's co-curricular program through a variety of sports, arts and service activities offered throughout the school day. Students choose from a number of age and skill-appropriate teams. They are introduced to the service program, with many opportunities both inside and outside the school.  Students with particular interests in Appleby's clubs and activities can join in Thursday after-school activities such as the Choir.

The Middle School co-curricular program allows students to explore new interests and develop their skills. It also prepares students for the rigours of the full Upper and Senior School program.

At the Middle School athletics level, coaches encourage the development of basic skills, good sportsmanship and teamwork. Students have numerous opportunities to participate and are carefully guided through new competitive challenges appropriate to their ability levels and developmental stages. Athletes on U14 teams have an opportunity to receive Middle School Colours at the end of each season for outstanding performance, commitment and leadership. For the most part, athletic activities take place during school hours but students may have the option to try out for some Upper-level athletics not offered to their age group.

Minimum Requirements:

  • three reporting periods of athletics
  • 10 hours of service for M1 students
  • 12 hours of service for M2 students

Please click on the image below to view the Middle School Co-curricular program offering for 2018-2019.

Upper School

Upper School Co-curriculars

Appleby's co-curricular requirements change substantially from the Middle to Upper School. Upper One students have the option to pursue Arts or Service co-curriculars of their choosing as long as they participate in a minimum of six Athletics co-curriculars before concluding their Senior Two year. Competitive and instructional sports take place after school each day (except Fridays) and some Saturdays. Clubs run Mondays and Thursdays, Period 7.

The students' service commitment also increases to 25 hours. Students can complete their service either through school activities or outside the school. A wide variety of teams, clubs and activities are available to suit the students' interests and to help them achieve their co-curricular requirements.

Students in Upper One to Senior Two may apply to do all ATHLETICS for all of their co-curricular terms pending approval from the Assistant Head of School, Co-curricular Programs based on meeting the parameters for this exception.

Minimum Requirements:

  • option to pursue Arts or Service co-curriculars of their choosing as long as a minimum of six Athletics co-curriculars are taken before concluding the Senior Two year (one Fall exemption will be given to participate in the Upper School Play co-curricular)
  • one club (mandatory attendance for Bronze Duke of Edinburgh's Award – please note the clubs that count for this award by the ** in the maps and the Course Calendar descriptions.)
  • 25 hours of service

Exemptions: Application forms for exemption from any of the above requirements are to be submitted to the Assistant Head of School, Co-curricular Programs.

Please click on the image below to view the Upper School Co-curricular program offering for 2018-2019.

Senior School

Senior School Co-curriculars

Living in residence is a requirement for Senior Two students, where a Residential Life program is delivered.

Requirements:

  • three terms of co-curriculars
  • 25 hours of service
  • one club
  • Residential Life Program in Senior Two

Students in Upper One to Senior Two may apply to do all ATHLETICS for all of their co-curricular terms pending approval from the Assistant Head of School, Co-curricular Programs based on meeting the parameters for this exception.

Exemptions - Application forms for exemptions from any of the above requirements should be submitted to the Assistant Head of School, Co-curricular Programs.

Please click on the image below to view the Senior School Co-curricular program offering for 2018-2019.

Co-curricular Descriptions

Co-curricular Descriptions

Arts Co-curriculars

Arts

From the Middle School musical to the numerous arts options available for students, Appleby presents students with opportunities to excel in dance, drama, music, visual arts and the liberal arts. Middle School students are exposed to Appleby’s arts programs through the academic curriculum with required involvement in visual arts and music. Arts offerings expand in the Upper and Senior Schools. Upper School students are required to participate in at least one arts club and Senior students must take at least one reporting period of arts or service.

Today, in order to be successful, people must be able to be versatile, critical thinkers, researchers, creative developers, resourceful problem-solvers, technology savvy marketers, independent workers or team players, innovators, philosophers and pragmatists. They should be prepared for constant change and upheaval while able to adjust instantly and flexibly to a new set of parameters or requirements. They must have confidence, creativity and a strong attention to detail.

The intrinsic value of arts education is that it cultivates the whole student. In addition to advancing creative skills, arts education also encourages the development of essential attitudes, characteristics and intellectual abilities such as reasoning, creativity, dexterity, problem solving and teamwork. At Appleby, we teach that the arts have meaning beyond the aesthetic they are relevant courses of study applicable in many aspects of life. Art is everywhere in life, and being able to understand and appreciate it adds to living life completely. More directly, the arts encompass a multitude of professions, and students can use what they learn at Appleby throughout higher educational levels and make a valuable contribution to society.

Senior School students are required to take one reporting period of Arts or Service. Activities are open to all students, unless listed “audition.”

The diamond mark Colours indicates activities where participants are eligible to receive their colours.

Fall

Appleby Rocks!

(Audition) Do you want to be part of the next big musical adventure at Appleby? Then this co-curricular is for you! “Appleby Rocks” is a high level performance ensemble open to the following instrumentation: drums, bass guitar, electric guitar, piano/keyboards, saxophone, trumpet and trombone. We will also have spots for up to 8 vocalists (all vocal ranges are needed) who are comfortable singing a range of vocal styles. “Appleby Rocks” will perform a varied repertoire of jazz, Latin, rock, R & B, gospel, blues and funk, all musicians must be experienced and able to hold their own parts and sing as soloists as well as members of an ensemble.

Broadcasting/ACTV

Appleby’s Broadcasting Club is a weekly tribute to the spoken and written word, giving voice to aspiring writers, speakers, musicians and thinkers. It is designed as a giving back to our community, embracing the Residential Life Program with the international flavour of our student body. The show features the segments of news, fiction, a variety of poetry and rap, a section called "Did you know...?" as well as humour and comedy in addition to a "Guess What's Happening on Campus" section, punctuated by lots of music.

Computer Graphics 

This co-curricular offers students the opportunity to experience the world of computer graphics and digital animation, using programs such as Flash and Photoshop and experimenting with scanning and photography. No artistic ability necessary – just creative curiosity!

Computer Programming

This co-curricular provides an opportunity to develop skills in coding, problem solving, and computational thinking. Possible projects include video game design, app development, robotics, or other hardware-based applications. Students are encouraged to try Scratch, Arduino, Unity, or Java, and choose the path that most inspires them.

Debating

Aimed at students who would like to practice and perfect their Debating and Public Speaking skills, students are provided with the opportunity to work closely with experienced coaches. With curriculum developed for individual student needs, those already involved in Debating competitions will have the opportunity to enhance existing skills, while those new to the discipline will learn the basics. Meeting four hours a week, students aiming to become members of the Provincial and National Debating and Public Speaking Teams will benefit from individual coaching and additional practice. Topics covered include Parliamentary and Cross-Examination Debating, Persuasive, Extemporaneous, After Dinner and Impromptu Speaking, Dramatic and Interpretive Reading and Radio Newscast. No experience necessary and students of all levels welcome.

Digital Photography

Students learn the basic and advanced functions of a digital camera and how to download and manipulate their images in Adobe Photoshop. Students learn how to use blogs and other online resources for sharing and critiquing their photographs and the work of others. Each student will have the opportunity to lead the group in a project of their choice while at the same time contributing to a larger ongoing project created for the Argus. Past projects have included a themed group collage, photographic essays and various subject studies.

Painting

This co-curricular is geared specifically towards senior art students with an eye towards studying art in the post-secondary environment. Students will be given a thorough introduction to painting materials including types of paint, pigments, materials and media. Working around a thematic framework, students will create a minimum of three pieces. This co-curricular is open to senior art students with strong technical skills and a commitment to developing an outstanding portfolio of work. Interview required.

School Newspaper

The school newspaper blends thoughtful journalism with a creative and often humorous voice. The paper will include coverage of Appleby’s sports, arts and service events, columns – sometimes serious, often comedic, and occasionally even downright silly - on the day-to-day lives of Appleby students, and various cartoons, crosswords, Sudokus, horoscopes and advice columns, all focused on the Appleby experience. Reporters, writers, artists and designers are all welcome to help report on what life is really like at Appleby College.

Sculpture

The sculpture co-curricular offers the opportunity to work with a variety of materials to learn both additive and subtractive techniques while working in three dimensions. You will have the chance to explore working with clay, plaster, paper, environmentally sustainable materials as well as found objects to create your pieces. This co-curricular is suitable for students who participate in Visual Arts and could be used to help build portfolio-worthy artwork.

Upper School Visual Arts

The Upper School Visual Arts co-curricular is a little taste of all things art! Students rotate through a variety of visual art approaches, spending about 2 weeks in each of sculpture, painting, drawing, printmaking, and digital design creating student-inspired work from group-inspired themes. Traditional and non-traditional materials will be explored.

Winter

Advanced Portfolio Development

This co-curricular is for students in S1 or S2 wishing to put together a portfolio for AP studio art and/or applications to post-secondary art or architecture programs. Students work on creating pieces that add depth to their portfolio – beyond what they create in their academic art classes. Students may work in any media with teacher direction and supervision. This co-curricular is for serious art students with strong technical skills and a commitment to developing an outstanding portfolio of work. Senior visual arts students are welcome. Interview required.

Argus

Appleby’s school yearbook requires students with graphic design, editorial, digital design or photography skills. Besides the arts credit, service hours, up to 25 hours, may be granted for work beyond the one hour per week minimum commitment.

Debating 

Aimed at students who would like to practice and perfect their Debating and Public Speaking skills, students are provided with the opportunity to work closely with experienced coaches. With curriculum developed for individual student needs, those already involved in Debating competitions will have the opportunity to enhance existing skills, while those new to the discipline will learn the basics. Meeting four hours a week, students aiming to become members of the Provincial and National Debating and Public Speaking Teams will benefit from individual coaching and additional practice. Topics covered include Parliamentary and Cross-Examination Debating, Persuasive, Extemporaneous, After Dinner and Impromptu Speaking, Dramatic and Interpretive Reading and Radio Newscast. No experience necessary and students of all levels welcome.

Digital Music

This co-curricular covers all aspects of making or editing music using computers with or without instruments. Students can choose to work in small groups or individually based on their interest and desired platform (Mac/PC) and will have access to a variety of programs such as GarbageBand, Pro Tools, JamStudio, MIDI and others. Students interested in exploring beat-making or honing DJing skills such as beat-matching are also welcome. If you are interested in making or editing music on your computer, this co-curriculuar is for you!

Model UN/ACMUN 

Participants learn the intricacies of constructing a case, debating and public speaking. Model United Nations (MUN) is a popular way for students to participate in a forum on international issues and to develop in a number of areas, including knowledge of global affairs and public speaking skills. Students step into the shoes of ambassadors from UN member states to debate current issues. They prepare draft resolutions, plot strategy, negotiate with supporters and adversaries, resolve conflicts and navigate the UN’s rules of procedures - all in the interest of mobilizing international co-operation to resolve problems. This activity will appeal to students who would like to improve their ability to talk in front of a group, and who would like to assist in organizing the spring Appleby-hosted Model UN conference.

Film Studies

Film Studies is an introduction to the fundamental aspects of cinema as an art form. Film studies explores how the filmmaker’s choices and combination of specific film techniques, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing and sound, contribute to the overall form of a film. Students gain a critical awareness of the stages of film production, distribution and exhibition in examining films from a historical stance. The end result is that students become more appreciative and informed viewers of cinema.

School Newspaper

The school newspaper blends thoughtful journalism with a creative and often humorous voice. The paper will include coverage of Appleby’s sports, arts and service events, columns – sometimes serious, often comedic, and occasionally even downright silly - on the day-to-day lives of Appleby students, and various cartoons, crosswords, Sudokus, horoscopes and advice columns, all focused on the Appleby experience. Reporters, writers, artists and designers are all welcome to help report on what life is really like at Appleby College.

School Play 

(Audition) Acting: Love to sing, dance and act, or want to learn? Try out for the school play! Be part of an intensely fun rehearsal process preparing a musical for performance at The Oakville Centre in late February. Auditions occur in late October. Technical Crew: This group produces the technical elements for the entire show including set design and construction, lighting, sound, costumes, props, make-up and publicity. Pit Band: The pit band is a performance ensemble that learns and performs the music for the School Play. All instrument types are needed, including strings, brass, woodwinds, percussion and piano. The music is typically fast-paced and challenging.

Sewing

Details coming soon...

VEX Robotics

The VEX Robotics co-curricular gives students the opportunity to explore the world of robotics through the building, programming, and testing their own robots. Specifically, students learn about what makes robots tick, from the actual nuts-and-bolts of robotics to the math, science and culture behind them. The VEX model is followed, though in a non-competitive setting.

Spring

Advanced Portfolio Development

This co-curricular is for students in S1 or S2 wishing to put together a portfolio for AP studio art and/or applications to post-secondary art or architecture programs. Students work on creating pieces that add depth to their portfolio – beyond what they create in their academic art classes. Students may work in any media with teacher direction and supervision. This co-curricular is for serious art students with strong technical skills and a commitment to developing an outstanding portfolio of work. Senior visual arts students are welcome. Interview required.

Appleby Rocks!

(Audition) Do you want to be part of the next big musical adventure at Appleby? Then this co-curricular is for you! “Appleby Rocks” is a high level performance ensemble open to the following instrumentation: drums, bass guitar, electric guitar, piano/keyboards, saxophone, trumpet and trombone. We will also have spots for up to 8 vocalists (all vocal ranges are needed) who are comfortable singing a range of vocal styles. “Appleby Rocks” will perform a varied repertoire of jazz, Latin, rock, R & B, gospel, blues and funk, all musicians must be experienced and able to hold their own parts and sing as soloists as well as members of an ensemble.

Argus

Appleby’s school yearbook requires students with graphic design, editorial, digital design or photography skills. Besides the arts credit, service hours, up to 25 hours, may be granted for work beyond the one hour per week minimum commitment.

Debating

Aimed at students who would like to practice and perfect their Debating and Public Speaking skills, students are provided with the opportunity to work closely with experienced coaches. With curriculum developed for individual student needs, those already involved in Debating competitions will have the opportunity to enhance existing skills, while those new to the discipline will learn the basics. Meeting four hours a week, students aiming to become members of the Provincial and National Debating and Public Speaking Teams will benefit from individual coaching and additional practice. Topics covered include Parliamentary and Cross-Examination Debating, Persuasive, Extemporaneous, After Dinner and Impromptu Speaking, Dramatic and Interpretive Reading and Radio Newscast. No experience necessary and students of all levels welcome.

Dance Training

There is no better co-curricular to excite, motivate and push kinetic boundaries while resetting your own personal bar of excellence when it comes to expressive movement. Dance Training is designed to refine technique in jazz, ballet, contemporary and occassionally hip hop dance. This co-curricular provides studio grade dance training for busy Appleby students who don't have time to train at a private dance studio or who want to continue their intensive training while attending Appleby.

Middle School Play 

(Spring reporting period, four days a week) Middle School students work together to produce a play performed in Willis Hall during the spring. Auditions occur before March Break and students may participate onstage and backstage. Leadership opportunities in stage management and choreography are available to Senior students and are eligible for colours.

Practical Arts

Students will have the opportunity to explore the more practical aspects of the arts. They can design and create anything they can dream up, from clothing to furniture.

School Newspaper

The school newspaper blends thoughtful journalism with a creative and often humorous voice. The paper will include coverage of Appleby’s sports, arts and service events, columns – sometimes serious, often comedic, and occasionally even downright silly - on the day-to-day lives of Appleby students, and various cartoons, crosswords, Sudokus, horoscopes and advice columns, all focused on the Appleby experience. Reporters, writers, artists and designers are all welcome to help report on what life is really like at Appleby College.

 

Athletics Co-curriculars

Athletics

Whether through competitive teams or instructional sports, participation in athletics is a key component of the Appleby program. Athletics develops physical fitness, athletic skills, school pride, teamwork and a sense of fair play. Students participate in age- and skill-appropriate activities and enjoy access to quality facilities and programs. Beginning in Middle School, students are exposed to a wide variety of activities, giving them an opportunity to try new sports. In Upper and Senior School, students continue to develop sport-specific skills and work towards representing Appleby at the Senior level.

The Appleby Athletics program is a well-known and highly valued aspect of the student's co-curricular life. Staffed by enthusiastic and well-trained coaches, this program provides every individual with an enormous variety of dynamic and exciting sports experiences. Students must try out for all competitive teams and players who show leadership or exceptional skills are eligible to receive school Colours on teams marked Colours.

Evaluation of each student occurs at the end of each reporting period and coaches prepare a sports report which is included in the final report card. Appleby athletics is viewed as an integral part of students' holistic development. As such, Appleby strives to ensure that students have the chance to explore and fully develop their physical, social and emotional potential throughout the years in the program.

Competitive teams compete in the following leagues:
CISAA - Canadian Conference of Independent Schools Athletic Association
OFSAA - Ontario Federation of Schools Athletic Association
Please note that team levels may vary each year according to interest in each sport.

Fall

COMPETITIVE

Girls Basketball Colours U14 Colours Junior Colours Senior Division 1

Individual skill development and team strategies are emphasized at all levels with increasing complexity. All three teams compete in the CISAA league with the other area independent schools. Our basketball teams have the opportunity to participate in tournaments within the independent school system and throughout the Greater Toronto Area. An average week will consist of three to four practices with the possibility of one to two games.

Co-ed Cross-Country Colours U14 Colours Senior Team

Appleby’s Cross-Country programme is enhanced by the natural training grounds which surround the school. Emphasis is placed on personal goal-setting, race strategies and training both the mind and the body for successful performance. At the Senior level, runners have the opportunity to advance to the OFSAA championships through the CISAA finals.

Girls Field Hockey Colours U14 Colours Senior Division 2 Colours Senior Division 1

At the U14 level, the girls are introduced to basic skills and fundamentals and develop a better understanding of the sport. The Senior Division 2 team consists of both Junior and Senior aged students and compete in a lower Senior division. At this level, development is still the primary objective and students continue to build upon their skills that were first introduced in Middle School. Games and practices run throughout the week, including Saturdays. Typically, at the Senior Division 1 level, our athletes have risen through the ranks (U14, Junior or Senior Division 2); some girls have also started to play in external leagues in the area, and at the provincial level. The coaching focus is to improve upon existing skills and fitness and to further develop field positioning and game strategies. Although there is a strong emphasis on competition, this should not detract from those individuals that are interested in trying Field Hockey for the first time.

Boys Soccer ColoursU14 Colours Junior Division 1 and Junior Division 2 Colours Senior Division 2 Colours Senior Division 1 

The program begins at the Middle One level when every student is introduced to fundamental skills during physical education classes. Boys have an opportunity to play on the school teams at all levels. In each successive year fundamentals are reviewed with an increasing emphasis on technique, skill, speed and team strategy. All teams compete in the CISAA league and participate in local tournaments. Senior team players devote time to specific skills and fitness training as part of their practice. 

Boys Volleyball Colours U14 Colours Junior Colours Senior Division 1

At the U14 level, students are introduced to fundamentals of the game. The emphasis is placed on positional play and skill development. At the Junior level, skill development is still stressed and an introduction to systems, attacking and blocking are developed. At the Senior Division 1 level, the athletes are molded into a competitive team. The Senior team will place a greater emphasis on competition, while still developing the ability to use the skills acquired effectively. Teams compete in the CISAA and can participate in tournaments throughout the Greater Toronto Area.

FITNESS / INSTRUCTIONAL 

Bronze Cross/Bronze Medallion Instructional Co-ed

This program teaches the lifesaving principals embodied in the four components of water rescue: judgement, knowledge, skills and fitness. Through fitness in swimming strokes and learning rescue techniques, the students will develop a specialized set of skills. Students will learn Emergency First Aid, CPR procedures for Adult, Child and Infants along with treatment of various injuries and medical emergencies. This course offers aquatic leadership skills and requires responsibility and personal excellence to be successful in completion of the certification.

Fitness Training - Co-ed

Students taking Fitness Training will learn about making informed, healthy lifestyle choices. By working on their endurance and strength in the Appleby fitness centre, students will improve their level of fitness. Exercise equipment includes treadmills, elliptical machines, stationary bikes and weight machines. Sound nutritional information will be discussed as it relates to students' level of fitness. Many students use this co-curricular to improve or maintain conditioning for an upcoming sport.

Intermediate Run - Co-ed

The Intermediate Run Group makes it possible for both elite and recreational runners to improve their overall conditioning and endurance. The group also affords runners the chance to learn how to run for fun and fitness.

Learn to Swim

This program is designed for those students who have had limited swimming experience in the past. It is appropriate for individuals who have taken a few swimming lessons or those who would consider themselves as non-swimmers. This program aims to promote and encourage a greater level of comfort, efficiency in the water and to increase their overall skill level across the four main strokes of freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke and butterfly. Students will also learn sculling, diving and general water safety.

Novice Run - Co-ed

The Novice Run Group is an enjoyable and positive way for students to become heart healthy outdoors any time of the year. One of the great benefits of walking/running is that it is a total body activity. Research indicates that walking even 30 minutes a day can benefit your heart, increase your lifespan, help you control weight and diabetes, prevent disease and improve your mood.

Instructional Squash - Co-ed

Students, no matter their ability, improve their racquet skills and knowledge of the game in a fun and non-competitive atmosphere. Towards the end of the term, students can participate in and officiate a fun-spirited tournament.

Instructional Tennis - Co-ed

The instructional tennis program is geared to students who have little or no background in tennis. Students are taught basic tennis skills as well as methods of scoring, rules of the game and basic tactics for doubles play. Students will also compete in some modified games to apply their new skills.

Weight Training

The weight training co-curricular uses a 8-10 week program in the on-campus weight rooms to teach weight training skills and to strengthen and help the students to achieve a better overall level of fitness. The students will record and analyze their results throughout the course. The days are designed to be either more traditional body building activities or that of a 'Cross Fit' style routine which will change throughout the course. Regardless of a student's beginning level of fitness the resistance level and exercises will be set by the instructors of the program to match abilities. This program is open to all students but there is an exception that all participants work hard, with intensity, on a daily basis. This program is also suitable for students playing a high level of sport which encourages a specific and personalized fitness program to enhance personal performance.

Pilates/Yoga - Co-ed

Designed for all fitness levels, Pilates focuses on body control and conditioning by strengthening and stretching the muscles, focusing on core development as well as improving flexibility and balance. Almost a cross between yoga stretching and calisthenics, Pilates enhances body alignment, strengthens the abs, back and stabilizer muscles, stretches, strengthens and relaxes your body.

Zumba

Zumba is a fusion of Latin and International music - dance themes that create a dynamic, exciting, effective fitness system! The routines feature aerobic/fitness interval training with a combination of fast and slow rhythms that tone and sculpt the body. Zumba utilizes the principles of fitness interval training and resistance training to maximize caloric output, fat burning and total body toning. It is a mixture of body sculpting movements with easy to follow dance steps.

Winter

COMPETITIVE

Boys Basketball Colours U14 Colours Junior Division 2, Junior Division 1 Colours Senior Division 1B

Individual skill development and team strategies are emphasized at all levels with increasing complexity. All three teams compete in the CISAA league against the other area independent schools. Our basketball teams have the opportunity to participate in tournaments within the independent school system and throughout the Greater Toronto Area. An average week will consist of three to four practices with the possibility of one to two games. 

Boys Hockey Colours U14 (co-ed) Colours Senior Division 2 Colours Senior Division 1

Appleby’s program strength lies in our devotion to player development. Although our U14 team competes in a boys' league, girls are encouraged to join, as this team competes as a co-ed squad. The Senior Division 2 team participates in a non-contact league and consists of players from Upper One to Senior Two. The Senior Division 1 programme will have athletes on the ice 5-6 times weekly. This programme is intended for the dedicated player with ambition to raise his game to higher levels. Off-season training requirements and a fall pre-season programme underscore the dedication to total development. With the advantages of an on-campus arena and a dedicated professional-style dressing room that includes laundry facilities, the programme has everything for the serious developing player. 

Girls Hockey Colours Senior Team

This very successful programme maintains a high emphasis on individual skill development with a healthy practice to game ratio. The Women’s Varsity team competes in the CISAA league and has numerous opportunities to play exhibition games against other Canadian or American schools. The team is typically on the ice 5-6 times weekly in our on-campus arena, complete with a dedicated professional-style dressing room and laundry facilities. This programme is appropriate for girls from Upper One to Senior Two who are serious about their hockey, and who would also like to advance to higher levels of play. 

Co-ed Squash Colours U14 Colours Junior Colours Senior Team

Squash begins at the U14 level with a basic introduction to the game, concentrating on developing strokes and continuing rallies. The program continues with more competitive play at the Junior level, with games against other CISAA schools. Coaching at this level introduces strategy and fitness training. At the Senior Team level, competition consists of tournaments between CISAA schools, and additional practice sessions with local club pros are included. Squash is played in the boys’ league but girls are welcome on the team.

Co-ed Swimming Colours U14 Colours Junior Colours Senior Team

The swimming program begins at the U14 level where emphasis is on stroke development, fun and fitness. Students of all abilities are encouraged to participate and compete in CISAA meets. Junior team swimming provides an opportunity for athletes to compete at a higher level and to continue their development of technique and fitness. Senior and Junior swimmers may have the opportunity to compete in CISAA and OFSAA competitions. Individuals are encouraged to strive for personal best performances. Although swimming is largely an individual sport, team spirit is an integral part of the Appleby swimming experience and swimmers are able to combine dry-land training with their regular practice schedule to achieve individual and team goals.

Girls Volleyball U14 Colours Junior Division 1 and Division 2 Colours Senior Division 1B

At the U14 level, students are introduced to fundamentals of the game. The emphasis is placed on positional play and skill development. At the Junior level, skill development is still stressed and an introduction to systems, attacking and blocking are developed. At the Senior Division 1 level, the athletes are molded into a competitive team. The Senior team will place a greater emphasis on competition, while still developing the ability to use the skills acquired effectively. Teams compete in the CISAA and can participate in tournaments throughout the Greater Toronto Area.

FITNESS / INSTRUCTIONAL

Fitness Training - Co-ed

Students taking Fitness Training will learn about making informed, healthy lifestyle choices. By working on their endurance and strength in the Appleby fitness centre, students will improve their level of fitness. Exercise equipment includes treadmills, elliptical machines, stationary bikes and weight machines. Sound nutritional information will be discussed as it relates to students' level of fitness. Many students use this co-curricular to improve or maintain conditioning for an upcoming sport.

Indoor Soccer - Co-ed

Instructional Soccer provides students the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of the game while improving upon their skills and overall fitness. Coaches emphasize the components of fun, fair play and positive attitudes while the participant learns to play the game of soccer.

Morning Fitness

The general morning fitness program is aimed to get students active prior to the start of the academic day and takes a multi-faceted approach to fitness. There will be a focus on cardio, flexibility, core strength and functional movement. Each week students will participate in four different workouts ranging from a spinning session to 'boot camp' style classes with functional movement activities, a cardio interval training day focusing on core development and a day for running. This fitness program is open to students of all fitness levels and is designed to have something to interest the experienced athlete, beginner exerciser and everyone in between. The goal of the program is to increase the fitness level of all participants and encourage a lifelong interest in fitness.

Skating (Middle School only)

Instructional skating aims to develop, improve, and refine basic skills such as stroking, stopping, turning and backward skating. Students will learn balance and interpretive movement. This activity offers focused preparation for improving skills for recreational, figure, or hockey skating.

Weight Training

The weight training co-curricular uses a 8-10 week program in the on-campus weight rooms to teach weight training skills and to strengthen and help the students to achieve a better overall level of fitness. The students will record and analyze their results throughout the course. The days are designed to be either more traditional body building activities or that of a 'Cross Fit' style routine which will change throughout the course. Regardless of a student's beginning level of fitness the resistance level and exercises will be set by the instructors of the program to match abilities. This program is open to all students but there is an exception that all participants work hard, with intensity, on a daily basis. This program is also suitable for students playing a high level of sport which encourages a specific and personalized fitness program to enhance personal performance.

Pilates/Yoga

Designed for all fitness levels, Pilates focuses on body control and conditioning by strengthening and stretching the muscles, focusing on core development as well as improving flexibility and balance. Almost a cross between yoga stretching and calisthenics, Pilates enhances body alignment, strengthens the abs, back and stabilizer muscles, stretches, strengthens and relaxes your body.

Spring

COMPETITIVE

Co-ed Badminton Colours Senior Team

The Senior Badminton team is comprised of both Junior and Senior level students that compete in singles, doubles, and mixed doubles. Team members will be introduced to the fundamentals of the game, concentrating on developing strokes and continuing rallies. The team competes in six co-ed tournaments against other independent schools and the season culminates with a CISAA wide final.

Co-ed Golf Colours Junior Colours Senior Team

Team members prepare for the season at a driving range and at golf simulators in April, and on a course when applicable. Practices and tournaments continue throughout April and May. There are five Wednesday tournaments beginning in late April which culminate in the CISAA championship tournament. 

Boys Rugby Colours U14 Colours Junior Division 1 Colours Senior Division 1

Both boys and girls are welcome to participate in rugby at the U14 level as this team competes as a co-ed unit. The U14 team focuses on learning the basics of the game while competing in a touch league. At the Junior level, contact is introduced as students continue to build upon their fundamentals and skills. Development continues to be a key factor as athletes progress to the Senior level, but competition, systems, and strategies play a more prominent role. All teams play in the CISAA. Junior and Senior teams will compete in 4 to 5 matches each year, while the U14 team plays in Jamboree or Festival type tournaments. Our Senior team also competes in the annual CAIS Canadian National Tournament.

Girls Rugby - Senior Division 1

The Varsity Girls Rugby team plays within the CISAA League. Participants on the team will be in Upper One to Senior Two. The major focus of this program is to provide strong developmental training to team members allowing for a strong technical and tactical foundation of rugby skills. The team will play on average one league match per week and will enter one invitational event each season. In addition, the team will also compete in the CAIS Canadian National Tournament.

Boys Slow Pitch Colours U14 co-ed Colours Senior Division 1

The U14 co-ed team competes in six to eight games per season against other CISAA schools. Students learn the game basics and are taught offensive and defensive skills. The Senior team plays in the competitive CISAA league. Skill development will focus on improving throwing, catching and batting abilities, while gaining a better understanding of game strategies. Senior team members consist of boys ranging from Upper One to Senior Two.

Girls Slow Pitch Colours Senior Division 1

The Senior team plays in the competitive CISAA league. Skill development will focus on improving throwing, catching and batting abilities, while gaining a better understanding of game strategies. Senior team members consist of girls ranging from Upper One to Senior Two.

Girls Soccer Colours U14 Colours Junior Colours Senior Division 1

Girls can choose to play on the school teams at all levels and each successive year fundamentals are reviewed with an increasing emphasis on technique, skill, speed and team strategy. All teams play in the competitive CISAA leagues with top teams in each league participating in the end-of-season cup tournament. Fitness and the ability to run become more important as a student progresses through the age groups. 

Co-ed Tennis Colours U14 Colours Junior Colours Senior Team

Both the boys’ and girls’ teams consist of three doubles teams and two single players. Students are encouraged to improve both personal fitness and skills, while learning game strategies to use in competitive situations. All athletes have the opportunity to train on campus courts and play in the independent school league games. The season ends with a CISAA championship tournament, and the opportunity to compete in the OFSAA finals.

Track and Field co-ed U14, Junior Colours Senior Team

The Under-14 Track and Field programme makes it possible for Middle School students to be exposed to a wide range of events in a competitive environment. Students will have the opportunity to participate in short, middle and long distance track events, and also try multiple field events that include long jump, high jump, shot put, soft javelin and soft discus. There will be approximately 3 to 4 meets during the spring term, culminating in the CISAA championship at the end of May. Our Senior team will have the opportunity to compete in four meets throughout southern Ontario before moving on to the CISAA finals. Some of our students will then qualify to move on to the metro meet, and finally on to the OFSAA finals. Events include short, middle, and long-distance races, as well as hurdles and relays.

FITNESS / INSTRUCTIONAL

Instructional Badminton

Students will learn the rules of the sport of badminton and participate in doubles and singles matches in a non-competitive atmosphere. Instructional Badminton provides numerous opportunities for students to pursue lifelong sports, fitness activities and recreational pursuits. Coaches emphasize the components of fun, fair play and positive attitudes while the participant learns to play the game of badminton.

Bronze Cross/Bronze Medallion

This program teaches the lifesaving principals embodied in the four components of water rescue: judgement, knowledge, skills and fitness. Through fitness in swimming strokes and learning rescue techniques, the students will develop a specialized set of skills. Students will learn Emergency First Aid, CPR procedures for Adult, Child and Infants along with treatment of various injuries and medical emergencies. This course offers aquatic leadership skills and requires responsibility and personal excellence to be successful in completion of the certification.

Fitness Training - co-ed

Students taking Fitness Training will learn about making informed, healthy lifestyle choices. By working on their endurance and strength in the Appleby fitness centre, students will improve their level of fitness. Exercise equipment includes treadmills, elliptical machines, stationary bikes and weight machines. Sound nutritional information will be discussed as it relates to students' level of fitness. Many students use this co-curricular to improve or maintain conditioning for an upcoming sport.

Intermediate Run Group

The Intermediate Run Group makes it possible for both elite and recreational runners to improve their overall conditioning and endurance. The group also affords novice runners the chance to learn how to run for fun and fitness.

NLS Certification - co-ed Instructional 

This program teaches the lifesaving principals embodied in the four components of water rescue: judgement, knowledge, skills and fitness. Through fitness in swimming strokes and learning rescue techniques, the students will develop a specialized set of skills. Students will learn Emergency First Aid, CPR procedures for Adult, Child and Infants along with treatment of various injuries and medical emergencies. This course offers aquatic leadership skills and requires responsibility and personal excellence to be successful in completion of the certification.

Novice Run - co-ed

The Novice Run Group is an enjoyable and positive way for students to become heart healthy outdoors any time of the year. One of the great benefits of walking/running is that it is a total body activity. Research indicates that walking even 30 minutes a day can benefit your heart, increase your lifespan, help you control weight and diabetes, prevent disease and improve your mood.

Outdoor Games - co-ed

The Outdoor Games group will participate in exciting and diverse modified games and fun sport activities. The group will take part in exercises and activities across a range of sport. Coaches emphasize the components of leadership, fun, fair play and positive attitudes.

Rock Climbing

The instructional Rock Climbing co-curricular provides an opportunity for students to develop confidence, self-esteem and improve problem solving skills while also experiencing a challenging workout. In a safe environment, students are introduced to various types of climbing with a focus on bouldering. Key programme elements include: belay and spotting instruction, understanding safety equipment, exploring the physics of climbing, training programmes, technique instruction, competition climbing strategies, route/problem setting, reading problems and routes.

Instructional Squash - co-ed

Students, no matter their ability, improve their racquet skills and knowledge of the game in a fun and non-competitive atmosphere. Towards the end of the term, students have the opportunity to participate in and referee a fun-spirited tournament.

Table Tennis

The instructional table tennis program is designed for students who either have the experience of playing this sport in the past or never played before but want to learn. The purpose of this program is to teach participants some fundamental skills in this sport and to improve the level of their skills through daily drills. Some in-house tournaments will be organized to instill the spirit of fair and fun competition.

Weight Training

The weight training co-curricular uses a 8-10 week program in the on-campus weight rooms to teach weight training skills and to strengthen and help the students to achieve a better overall level of fitness. The students will record and analyze their results throughout the course. The days are designed to be either more traditional body building activities or that of a 'Cross Fit' style routine which will change throughout the course. Regardless of a student's beginning level of fitness the resistance level and exercises will be set by the instructors of the program to match abilities. This program is open to all students but there is an exception that all participants work hard, with intensity, on a daily basis. This program is also suitable for students playing a high level of sport which encourages a specific and personalized fitness program to enhance personal performance.

Service Co-curriculars

Service Learning

Participation in Service Learning fosters an appreciation of the needs of a community as well as an understanding of social issues and those less fortunate in society. Through Service Learning placements, students learn not only about the cause or issue they support, but also the value of work performed in the service of others. Opportunities for service hours are available through organized school events and activities (such as service days, Walkathon, Spring Forward and Fall In) and through events outside the school. Appleby’s requirements also cover the Ministry of Education’s mandated hours of community involvement. The Service office also posts notices to students via the service bulletin board, web page and e-mails for upcoming special events or external placements.

The Service Learning program introduces students to service outreach opportunities such as helping elders, children, and adults with physical and intellectual challenges. There are also opportunities to explore social justice issues and organizations. The program educates students about the value of service in our society through experiential learning. Participation in the program enhances student skills, communication abilities, confidence, and commitment and reinforces a sense of responsibility to community. The program is student-centered. Students participate in a placement of their choosing. They are provided with training sessions designed to educate around the issues faced by the group or individuals they have chosen to serve and develop the appropriate skill set. Students are encouraged to set specific goals and are engaged in comprehensive wrap-up sessions at the end of the placement to facilitate opportunities for reflection and personal growth.

  • Applicants are advised to complete police checks prior to applying for any co-curricular service commitment. Most off-campus placements require these checks and they can take eight to 12 weeks to process.
  • Placement offerings and activities will vary from year to year depending on the needs of our community partners.
  • Students will be transported to and from their service placement in an Appleby van or by taxi.

Fall

Athletic Therapy (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working alongside Appleby’s Athletic Therapists, students assist our student athletes with taping, stretching and rehabilitation. Students interested in a career in Health Sciences have a unique opportunity to learn about the day-to- day responsibilities of trainers and sport therapists. (Senior Two students, interview-based selection.)

Community Living (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with Community Living staff, Appleby students get to know adults (‘buddies’) with intellectual disabilities and help them develop social skills that will allow them to integrate into the local community. Students socialize with their buddies at local coffee shops and the Community Living offices to chat and engage in age appropriate recreational activities (bowling, mini-golf, movies, baking, crafts, etc). Student experiences are enhanced by opportunities to learn about the issues faced by the individuals and the families served by Community Living through guided research, films, expert speakers and workshops.

Daycare (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the staff and children (age 6 months – 6 years) at daycares, Appleby students integrate into daycare programming and engage in games, arts and crafts, reading and free-play. They provide additional assistance to staff as required and may plan enrichment activities. Skill development is enhanced with guided learning, through research and workshops, on child development and early education theory, communication strategies, behaviour and classroom management techniques. (Police check with vulnerable sector screening that is less than 6-months old and vaccination records are required by the daycare centres for all volunteers.)

Earthworks / Ecomentors (Fall, Spring)

Working with local groups, the students provide enhancements to naturalized, outdoor spaces. Students learn about a wide variety of issues related to environmental and social sustainability through guided research, workshops and expert speakers. On campus, students work to implement initiatives to reduce the environmental impact of campus activities and to enhance the awareness of sustainability issues in our community.

Elementary After School Programs (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the staff and children (age 6 – 12 years old), in elementary after-school programs, students participate in existing programming including homework help, sports, crafts and games. There are also opportunities for students to plan and run enrichment activities, prepare and serve snacks. Training in the development of age-appropriate activities, leadership and communication skills will be provided and practiced. (Police check with vulnerable sector screening that is less than 6-months old and vaccination records are required by the daycare centres for all volunteers.)

IMPACT (Fall, Winter Spring)

Working with the United Way and Volunteer Halton, students research opportunities for youth to volunteer in the community. As a group, students plan and organize a range of shorter term, hands-on community service activities. The variety of activities allows students to gain an understanding of the myriad of ways that they can engage in community outreach and may lead to the identification of a passion for community service in an unanticipated area.

Independent Service Learning Placement (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the Director, Service Learning, students engage with a cause or community organization not available with any of our existing programs. With guidance, students research, make a connection, set goals, undertake a student planned program of community outreach with a local group or agency and reflect on their experience. (Senior students, interview-based selection.)

Social Justice (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with their peers to reach consensus, students undertake guided research to identify a relevant and appropriate social justice issue. The group then works together to acquire information through research, corresponding with experts, attending workshops and/or site visits to develop an action plan. The goal is to effectively advocate, empower, take action or raise awareness around the issue. Ideally, the action plan will have led to community engagement or change and success will be self-assessed through intentional reflection on the group’s activities and impacts.

Sunrise (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with local residential and community agency-based day programs students enrich the lives of seniors through conversation, shared activities, music and reading. Their experience is enhanced by opportunities to engage in learning about the issues affecting seniors, their families and caretakers through guided research, workshops and expert speakers. (Police check with vulnerable sector screening is required by the Seniors Residences for all volunteers.)

The Film Project (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the United Way and other local not-for profit agencies, students identify a group or issue and work on developing the multi-media and social networking content that is requested. Students learn skills related to film-making, editing, marketing and communication as well as a better understanding of the social issues affecting our local community.

Voices for Change (Fall, Spring)

Working with Appleby faculty, music therapists and local agencies, students use music as a tool for social inclusion, recovery, health, and overall well-being. Students will engage in musical experiences with a focus on community outreach. Love of music and a willingness to sing or play a musical instrument are required but all levels of skill and experience are able to join.

Winter

Athletic Therapy (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working alongside Appleby’s Athletic Therapists, students assist our student athletes with taping, stretching and rehabilitation. Students interested in a career in Health Sciences have a unique opportunity to learn about the day-to- day responsibilities of trainers and sport therapists. (Senior Two students, interview-based selection.)

Community Living (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with Community Living staff, Appleby students get to know adults (‘buddies’) with intellectual disabilities and help them develop social skills that will allow them to integrate into the local community. Students socialize with their buddies at local coffee shops and the Community Living offices to chat and engage in age appropriate recreational activities (bowling, mini-golf, movies, baking, crafts, etc). Student experiences are enhanced by opportunities to learn about the issues faced by the individuals and the families served by Community Living through guided research, films, expert speakers and workshops.

Daycare (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the staff and children (age 6 months – 6 years) at daycares, Appleby students integrate into daycare programming and engage in games, arts and crafts, reading and free-play. They provide additional assistance to staff as required and may plan enrichment activities. Skill development is enhanced with guided learning, through research and workshops, on child development and early education theory, communication strategies, behaviour and classroom management techniques. (Police check with vulnerable sector screening that is less than 6-months old and vaccination records are required by the daycare centres for all volunteers.)

Ecomentors (Winter)

Working with local groups, the students provide enhancements to naturalized, outdoor spaces. Students learn about a wide variety of issues related to environmental and social sustainability through guided research, workshops and expert speakers. On campus, students work to implement initiatives to reduce the environmental impact of campus activities and to enhance the awareness of sustainability issues in our community.

Elementary After School Programs (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the staff and children (age 6 – 12 years old), in elementary after-school programs, students participate in existing programming including homework help, sports, crafts and games. There are also opportunities for students to plan and run enrichment activities, prepare and serve snacks. Training in the development of age-appropriate activities, leadership and communication skills will be provided and practiced. (Police check with vulnerable sector screening that is less than 6-months old and vaccination records are required by the daycare centres for all volunteers.)

IMPACT (Fall, Winter Spring)

Working with the United Way and Volunteer Halton, students research opportunities for youth to volunteer in the community. As a group, students plan and organize a range of shorter term, hands-on community service activities. The variety of activities allows students to gain an understanding of the myriad of ways that they can engage in community outreach and may lead to the identification of a passion for community service in an unanticipated area.

Independent Service Learning Placement (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the Director, Service Learning, students engage with a cause or community organization not available with any of our existing programs. With guidance, students research, make a connection, set goals, undertake a student planned program of community outreach with a local group or agency and reflect on their experience. (Senior students, interview-based selection.)

Social Justice (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with their peers to reach consensus, students undertake guided research to identify a relevant and appropriate social justice issue. The group then works together to acquire information through research, corresponding with experts, attending workshops and/or site visits to develop an action plan. The goal is to effectively advocate, empower, take action or raise awareness around the issue. Ideally, the action plan will have led to community engagement or change and success will be self-assessed through intentional reflection on the group’s activities and impacts.

Sunrise (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with local residential and community agency-based day programs students enrich the lives of seniors through conversation, shared activities, music and reading. Their experience is enhanced by opportunities to engage in learning about the issues affecting seniors, their families and caretakers through guided research, workshops and expert speakers. (Police check with vulnerable sector screening is required by the Seniors Residences for all volunteers.)

The BIG Idea (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with their peers to reach consensus, students inspire each other with ideas to take positive action and make change in our local community.  Students are guided through the process of goal setting, planning and learning.  They will ultimately act on their “BIG IDEA”.  Through this process, students will have become better communicators, advocates, planners, leaders and have ultimately made a difference in the local community.

The Film Project (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the United Way and other local not-for profit agencies, students identify a group or issue and work on developing the multi-media and social networking content that is requested. Students learn skills related to film-making, editing, marketing and communication as well as a better understanding of the social issues affecting our local community.

Spring

Athletic Therapy (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working alongside Appleby’s Athletic Therapists, students assist our student athletes with taping, stretching and rehabilitation. Students interested in a career in Health Sciences have a unique opportunity to learn about the day-to- day responsibilities of trainers and sport therapists. (Senior Two students, interview-based selection.)

Community Living (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with Community Living staff, Appleby students get to know adults (‘buddies’) with intellectual disabilities and help them develop social skills that will allow them to integrate into the local community. Students socialize with their buddies at local coffee shops and the Community Living offices to chat and engage in age appropriate recreational activities (bowling, mini-golf, movies, baking, crafts, etc). Student experiences are enhanced by opportunities to learn about the issues faced by the individuals and the families served by Community Living through guided research, films, expert speakers and workshops.

Daycare (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the staff and children (age 6 months – 6 years) at daycares, Appleby students integrate into daycare programming and engage in games, arts and crafts, reading and free-play. They provide additional assistance to staff as required and may plan enrichment activities. Skill development is enhanced with guided learning, through research and workshops, on child development and early education theory, communication strategies, behaviour and classroom management techniques. (Police check with vulnerable sector screening that is less than 6-months old and vaccination records are required by the daycare centres for all volunteers.)

Earthworks / Ecomentors (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with local groups, the students provide enhancements to naturalized, outdoor spaces. Students learn about a wide variety of issues related to environmental and social sustainability through guided research, workshops and expert speakers. On campus, students work to implement initiatives to reduce the environmental impact of campus activities and to enhance the awareness of sustainability issues in our community.

Elementary After School Programs (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the staff and children (age 6 – 12 years old), in elementary after-school programs, students participate in existing programming including homework help, sports, crafts and games. There are also opportunities for students to plan and run enrichment activities, prepare and serve snacks. Training in the development of age-appropriate activities, leadership and communication skills will be provided and practiced. (Police check with vulnerable sector screening that is less than 6-months old and vaccination records are required by the daycare centres for all volunteers.)

Social Justice (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with their peers to reach consensus, students undertake guided research to identify a relevant and appropriate social justice issue. The group then works together to acquire information through research, corresponding with experts, attending workshops and/or site visits to develop an action plan. The goal is to effectively advocate, empower, take action or raise awareness around the issue. Ideally, the action plan will have led to community engagement or change and success will be self-assessed through intentional reflection on the group’s activities and impacts.

IMPACT (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the United Way and Volunteer Halton, students research opportunities for youth to volunteer in the community. As a group, students plan and organize a range of shorter term, hands-on community service activities. The variety of activities allows students to gain an understanding of the myriad of ways that they can engage in community outreach and may lead to the identification of a passion for community service in an unanticipated area.

Independent Service Learning Placement (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the Director, Service Learning, students engage with a cause or community organization not available with any of our existing programs. With guidance, students research, make a connection, set goals, undertake a student planned program of community outreach with a local group or agency and reflect on their experience. (Senior students, interview-based selection.)

Sunrise (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with local residential and community agency-based day programs students enrich the lives of seniors through conversation, shared activities, music and reading. Their experience is enhanced by opportunities to engage in learning about the issues affecting seniors, their families and caretakers through guided research, workshops and expert speakers. (Police check with vulnerable sector screening is required by the Seniors Residences for all volunteers.)

The BIG Idea (Winter, Spring)

Working with their peers to reach consensus, students inspire each other with ideas to take positive action and make change in our local community.  Students are guided through the process of goal setting, planning and learning.  They will ultimately act on their “BIG IDEA”.  Through this process, students will have become better communicators, advocates, planners, leaders and have ultimately made a difference in the local community.

The Film Project (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Working with the United Way and other local not-for profit agencies, students identify a group or issue and work on developing the multi-media and social networking content that is requested. Students learn skills related to film-making, editing, marketing and communication as well as a better understanding of the social issues affecting our local community.

Voices for Change (Fall, Spring)

Working with Appleby faculty, music therapists and local agencies, students use music as a tool for social inclusion, recovery, health, and overall well-being. Students will engage in musical experiences with a focus on community outreach. Love of music and a willingness to sing or play a musical instrument are required but all levels of skill and experience are able to join.

Clubs

Clubs

Clubs at Appleby allow students to dig deeper into an area of passion or to discover a new interest. Participation in the club program is mandatory for all students and there is an exceptional choice of experience and interests from which to choose. Club time is a chance for students to explore and dive into curiosities all while working with students from a variety of grades. The club programme at Appleby influences the culture of the school as students share and celebrate their achievements while developing leadership skills and an appreciation of community involvement.

The program is designed to allow students to gain further experience in a wide range of clubs which focus on the following areas of interest and growth: Arts & Design; Beyond the Classroom; Community Advocacy; Global Citizenship; Leadership; Wellbeing.

  • Activities are open to all students, unless marked “Audition/Interview.”
  • Activities marked with an * indicates club meets the Global Leadership diploma requirement.
  • Activities marked with an ** indicates club meets the Bronze Duke of Edinburgh requirement.
  • Activities marked */** indicates club meets both Global Leadership diploma and Bronze Duke of Edinburgh club requirements.

year round

Arts & Design

Arts & Design clubs provide students with an opportunity to be introduced to or hone their skills in a practical application of the club of their choice. Student learning outcomes focus on experiential education, knowledge and skills development. These clubs help students learn the value of repetitive practice while providing an opportunity to develop a new or existing passion.

Argus Photography**

Argus Photography Club members take pictures throughout the year to supply the Argus yearbook with candid moments. There is an expectation that photos are taken at events throughout the week, then uploaded to the Argus shared folder during club meeting time. There is an opportunity for a Senior School boarding student to head this club as his/her co-curricular.

Argus Yearbook Club**

Argus Yearbook Club gives students the opportunity to develop their graphic design, editorial, digital design or photography skills as they decide the content and layout of the school’s yearbook. Students work in groups on pages of their choice under the guidance of the yearbook student editors and club leaders.

Cantus Chamber Choir** 

Cantus Chamber Choir is a 35-voice auditioned choir. Students learn a variety of choral music in different styles and from musical eras over the course of the year. Cantus performs frequently, both at Appleby and in the greater community.  A high level of commitment is required and all students in Cantus are also encouraged to sing in the Chapel Choir.

Chapel Choir** 

Chapel Choir sings in Chapel most Fridays and presents the Carol Services in November. Additional projects include a retreat, VON memorial service, confirmation service, performing during arts night and run-out concerts. The choir performs a wide range of music, from gospel to Renaissance.

Choreography Club

Choreography Club provides a unique opportunity for students to express themselves and their inner emotions through the liberating nature of dance. Dance combines physical fitness, artistic talents, and cultural appreciation. In this, students learn different and new techniques of various types of dance or choose to focus on one particular type of dance that interests them. They will also choreograph to create their dance. Dance is a form of art and expression. Through the experience, they will not only learn different techniques but also apply their learnings to create something that represents themselves.

Concert Band** 

Concert Band is open to the full school and is comprised of all the main components of a concert band. It performs at Appleby and in the greater community whenever possible. Highlights include performances during Arts Week.

Cooking Club**

Cooking Club allows students to learn about and participate in the culinary Arts. Activities include learning some cooking basics as well as how to prepare some classic dishes. There are opportunities to cook for the community and special dinners for boarders. No previous cooking experience is necessary.

Craft Club**

Craft Club gives students the opportunity to learn how to create a variety of crafts. Major projects include knitting, embroidery, sewing and quilting. Students participate in a variety of community programs such as Quilt for a Cure for the Canadian Cancer Society and others.

Drawing Club**

Drawing Club offers students the opportunity to develop, refine and expand upon the drawing skills taught in academic courses, and continue participating in this art form even if it no longer fits into a student’s timetable. Club members work in numerous drawing media, exploring a wide variety of subjects. The club is designed as a relaxing hour where creativity can flow.

Graphic Novel Club**

Graphic Novel Club gives an opportunity for students to explore everything that makes up the pages of a comic or graphic novel. The club introduces students to the world of creating sequential art in page form. The primary focus is the creation of a character and bringing it to “life” visually.

Guitar Club**

Guitar Club focuses on the art of guitar playing. Beginner, intermediate and advanced players are welcome. All styles of guitar playing are explored. Students may work individually, in small groups and also with the full club. Advanced players may audition for the Appleby Guitar Performance Ensemble. Having a guitar is the prerequisite for this club.

Middle School Drama Club

Middle School Drama Club provides students with the opportunity to explore their creative side through dramatic performance. Each week students have fun exploring a variety of forms of drama such as games, improv, story-telling, and scene work. Students have opportunities to perform throughout the school year.

Orchestra** 

Appleby College orchestra is a proper symphony orchestra with a full complement of brass, stringed, percussion, and woodwind instruments that performs advanced-level music from the grand symphonic tradition as well as popular and light classic repertoire. Highlights include a Christmas and Holiday music concert, performances during Arts Week and the annual concerto competition. Entry is by audition or invitation.

Photography Club**

Photography Club explores the art and science of making great images. Topics include light, exposure, shutter speed, composition, colour and texture. Students contribute their photos to themed compositions on a regular basis, build a portfolio of their pictures, and make regular presentations to the group about the images they have captured.

Tech Projects

The Tech Projects Club is designed for students interested in learning about re-configuring computers, gaming devices and other technology into fun and interesting tools. Students will have their say as to the projects they want to tackle and be guided by two technology experts in the process. Sample projects include: Using alternative operating systems and programs on a Sony PS3; starting your own web hosting company; Wii remote/nunchuck modification for XP; building your own Linux web/e-mail server; turning an old computer into a 4-port Ethernet router; running your own Voice-over-IP server (VoIP); game programming. New projects will be added regularly.

Beyond the Classroom

Beyond the Classroom clubs provide students with an opportunity to dig in deeper into an academic area they are passionate about. These clubs are for students who wish to work at an advanced level on specific academic topics solely for learning. Student learning outcomes focus on experiential education, knowledge and skills development.

Biomedical Club

Biomedical Club focuses on the study of Health Science and Biomedical Science, promoting career opportunities in the health care industry. The club features a wide array of activities such as case studies and discussions about topics in medical sciences, guest speakers, a quarterly newspaper, and the annual BASEF Science Fair. Students will also train for various conferences/competitions, mock test/simulations with focus on HOSA Canada and Brain Bee.

Debating and Public Speaking**

Debating and Public Speaking Club provides an opportunity for students to practice and perfect their debating and public speaking skills. Students are provided with the opportunity to work closely with experienced coaches. With curriculum developed for individual student needs, those already involved in Debating competitions have the opportunity to write speeches and enhance existing skills, while those new to the discipline learn the basics.

Entrepreneurial Business Club

Entrepreneurial Business Club supports students to develop their innovative, creative and practical abilities by participating in a real business venture. Students develop competencies in marketing, logistics, operations, finance, technology and communication through a series of guest speakers, practical activities and a yearlong business project. Students also have the opportunity to participate in business competitions hosted throughout the year such as DECA and various Case competitions. These competitions give students a practical opportunity to put into action what they have learned during the school year.

Horticulture Club**

Horticulture Club is for students who are passionate about and have a love for all plants. Students work in the greenhouse facility growing a variety of domestic and exotic plants. Students also conduct plant experiments while sharpening gardening skills and enjoying the tranquil company of plants.

Integrated Science Club

Integrated Science Club provides students scientific opportunities that are exciting and meaningful. They attend video conferences with scientists, researchers, and doctors to learn about their experiences, career and expertise. The students design, develop, and conduct an experiment which answers the focus question of their choice. They have virtual meetings with the scientists at the Canadian Light Source, the national synchrotron facility in Saskatoon and they also have an opportunity to visit and use the synchrotron to research their focus question with advanced scientific techniques.

Mathematics Club

Mathematics Club provides students a fun, stimulating environment where they work together on interesting problems and learn new mathematical concepts from each other. Students may also participate in friendly team competitions and, if inclined, work with similarly minded students to prepare for math contests.

MS Science and Robotics

Middle School Science and Robotics provides students the chance to practice problem-solving skills in a variety of ways. It focuses on tasks outlined in the First Lego League description. Activities will focus on three areas: robot mission, research project, and team building. Students will develop their creativity and problem-solving skills in each of these areas over the course of the year.

Music Appreciation Club

Music Appreciation brings the love of music into the Appleby community while exploring about the world/history in the process. It provides an opportunity to research favourite songs and discuss the social/cultural/historical frameworks from which the songs emerged, as well as interpret lyrics and discuss musical style. Collaborations with other clubs and student organizations use the latest technology to share playlists/songs/presentations with the community.

Online Writing Lab (OWL)

Online Writing Lab (OWL) is an add-on online club introduced for the promotion, publishing and improvement of student writing. Students e-mail written work (all types of creative and expository writing) to OWL and within two to four days, the OWL feedback team edits the work for style and content and returns the writing via e-mail. The OWL website also contains numerous links to useful sources for students during all stages of the writing process.

Science Club

Science Club engages students in a variety of exciting activities including: pyrotechnics, sugar chlorate and permanganate reactions, elephant toothpaste, hydrogen soap bubbles, black powder, the making of ignition fuses and fire and ice. The projects are all research based and the members are required to develop the most efficient conditions for each reaction. Once they have obtained the necessary expertise they are invited to experiment with topics of their own choice.

Community Advocacy

Community Advocacy clubs provide students the opportunity to learn about issues and organizations, plan effective actions and ultimately reflect on their experiences and impacts. Student learning outcomes are focused around advocacy, reflection and values. Clubs partner with a wide variety of community agencies and organizations.  During the year clubs plan and run a wide variety of fundraisers, school-wide activities and awareness raising events.

Buddies R Us*

Buddies R Us partners with the FUTURES program at White Oaks Secondary School to provide enrichment programming and socialization for students with special needs.  The club plans activities, both on and off campus, for their Buddies.

Camp VISTA*

Camp VISTA (Volunteers Inspiring Smiles Together Always) partners with elementary schools to plan PA Day programming for children in the local community who otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford care on P.D. days.  Students run active activities, arts and crafts projects and recreational swim time for the elementary school students.

GSA Club

GSA Club facilitates conversations and alliances within the school community. Students learn about the issues and challenges that are of concern to the LGBTQ+ community and plan ways create a safe and welcoming community for students of any sexual or gender orientation at the school. The GSA club is open to students who identify as straight and as LGBTQ+.  

Kids4Kids Club*

Kids4Kids Club partners with the Oakville Community Foundation to experience the business side of philanthropy. Club is structures as a not for profit board and administers the endowment fund and researches and recommends local community organizations to receive funding annually. Additionally, the group evaluates student fundraising proposals for their merit, timing, cost and viability.

Newcomers Tutoring Club

Newcomers Tutoring Club is an add-on club that offers students the opportunity to connect and support one another in their academic endeavors. Tutors develop teaching and learning strategies that they implement during their tutoring sessions to assist their tutees in achieving academic success.

Oakwood Breakfast Club*

Oakwood Breakfast Club partners with Halton Food for Thought. Club members work with the Breakfast Program volunteers at Oakwood PS to prepare hot and nutritious breakfast for students.   

Partners in Health*

Partners in Health (PIH) is a global health organization dedicated to providing a preferential option for the poor in health care. Students for PIH will use the forums of education, advocacy, and fundraising, to help support Partners in Health and spread the word about its work and the importance of global health equity.

Peer Tutoring

The Peer Tutoring Club offers students the opportunity to connect and support one another in their academic endeavours. It is an add-on club that students may opt to participate in to earn service hours. Tutors develop teaching and learning strategies that they implement during tutoring sessions to assist their tutees in achieving academic success.

Right to Play*

Right to Play is a global organization that uses the transformative power of play to educate and empower children facing adversity. Club members will learn about the Right to Play organization and adapt their model of advocacy and outreach to impact children in our local as well as indigenous communities in Canada.

SPEAK*

(Application/Interview) The SPEAK mentorship program works within the students who are new English language instruction and the Appleby Community.  Mentors help break down language barriers and build student connectedness. The goal of the club is for students to connect with students in a safe space that in turn will build cohesiveness throughout the Appleby community.

Student Ambassadors Club*

(Application/Interview) Student Ambassadors work with the Admissions and Advancement Departments to represent the school in a variety of ways.  Ambassadors give tours to prospective families and provide logistic support at a wide range of Appleby events.   

Swim with Community Living*

Swim with Community Living club partners with Community Living Oakville.  Members make swimming possible for teens and young adults with developmental disabilities. Students design games and activities to promote physical fitness and foster confidence in the hearts and minds of the Community Living clients.

War Child Club*

War Child Club is affiliated with the Toronto office of War Child Canada to support the vision of creating a world where no child knows war. This club focuses on awareness raising and fundraising events to help children in countries affected by war, with a focus on the issue of child soldiers.

Global Citizenship

Global Citizenship clubs provide students with an opportunity to learn about and explore the world around them. These clubs are for students who have an interest in world issues and global affairs. Student learning outcomes focus on experiential education, knowledge and values.

Chinese Arts and Culture */**

In this club students and their faculty advisors work to engage with and promote Chinese art and culture at Appleby. This club has many interactive activities such as Chinese calligraphy and painting. The group also learns about and promotes other aspects of Chinese culture, such as analysis of Asian films, Chinese board games and tasting of different foods.

Hispanic Club*/**

In this club students work to engage with and promote Hispanic culture. The group focuses on the study of Hispanic culture through film, documentaries, dance, art and music from Hispanic countries around the world. Students work on preparing for a cultural event at the school (Cinco de Mayo). The Hispanic Club gives students an opportunity to raise awareness globally in working to support the Hispanic foundation: Shakira’s Barefoot Foundation.

MENA: Middle Eastern & North African Club*/**

Students work to engage with and promote Middle Eastern and North African culture. They are offered an introduction to dance, music, food and Arabic calligraphy. Students will be able to learn the basic steps of belly dancing and Dabke (group dancing) as well as food tasting and design posters for the Middle Eastern event. In addition, students will listen to Arabic music, watch films, and learn about the Middle Eastern culture, the oldest culture in history.

Model United Nations*/**

In this club students work to understand the principles of the United Nations parliamentary procedure, build debating skills, and develop public speaking confidence so that members may become more socially aware and engaged. The club utilizes interactive games to help students hone these skills in a fun and exciting way. Students are encouraged to participate in multiple official events such as ACMUN and the New York MUN Conference. Opportunities to attend conferences are based on grade band.  

Round Square Council*

Committed to the Round Square IDEALS of Internationalism, Democracy, Environmentalism, Adventure, Leadership and Service, Round Square Council members take an active role in the school community. Activities include the Literature for Life campaign, collecting and sorting donations for overseas communities, and helping other students understand what it means to be a Round Square School. Opportunities to attend an annual International and Regional Conference are available to council members.

Truth and Reconciliation Youth Initiative Club

In this community advocacy club students will have an opportunity to grow a greater awareness of the history of indigenous peoples in Canada, to understand the current challenges our nation faces in terms of fostering understanding and trust between indigenous and non-indigenous youth, and enabling members of our community to feel they are taking positive steps towards making our indigenous communities feel supported on the journey to Truth and Reconciliation. Through learning about indigenous history and current challenges, students will develop an understanding of their role in needing to support the goals of the Truth and Reconciliation. Students will be encouraged to participate in events that will help them connect with indigenous communities in this process. Through experiential opportunities club members will be enabled to move beyond a textbook understanding of indigenous issues and learn through active engagement in these issues.

Young Round Square

Students work to engage with and promote Round Square to the Middle School.  It focuses on the IDEALs of Round Square – internationalism, democracy, environment, adventure and leadership and the club works towards understanding these areas. Students have the opportunity to attend one conference per year at a Young Round Square school.

Leadership

Leadership clubs provide students with an opportunity to contribute to a variety of programme areas and grade bands. These clubs are for students who have an interest in learning more about leadership, their individual style of leadership and to develop a variety of leadership skills. Student learning outcomes focus on leadership, character, experiential education and values.

Academic Council

In this club students and their faculty advisors work to promote academics at Appleby. They assist in communicating academic policies, representing students at academic forums and events promoting academic success, create and support study groups, and raise student concerns and issues to faculty and administration.

Arts Council

In this club students  work to promote the arts at Appleby. They help to organize and run events, plan arts week, display new art and enjoy each other’s initiatives in the arts. This club is open to all Upper and Senior students.

Athletics Council

In this club students work to promote Appleby’s teams and raise the roof for the double blue!  They help to organize and execute spirit-raisers, fundraisers and are planners of all things athletic.  Open to all Upper and Senior students.

Chapel Council

(Application/Interview) In this club students work to promote the chapel programme at Appleby. The Chapel Council is composed of selected Senior Two students (Chapel Wardens) and Middle Two students (Beacons). They meet regularly and are involved in planning and leading services and promoting respect for the Chapel traditions. The Chapel Council is led by the Chapel Prefect, in cooperation with the Chapel faculty.

Community Wellbeing Council

In this club students work to promote health and wellness programming at Appleby. They aim to engage students in activities that encourage and empower smart, healthy and responsible choices by providing information, organizing and hosting presentations, submitting grant proposals and liaising with internal and external partners. The club focus is on issues related to fitness, nutrition and mental wellness.

International Council*

In this club students work to promote international education at Appleby. This club is comprised of Senior One and Senior Two students in pursuit of the Global Leadership Diploma. The club examines service leadership, growth through outdoor adventure, global issues and other student experiences related to their Global Leadership Diploma.  The group will discuss the role of reflection, issues of interest arising from international service projects, models of global leadership and exemplary global organizations. Students will support each other as they explore the issues that will form the basis of their Global Action Plans. Those students in Senior One will also engage in discussion around their international service and coop credit experiences.

Middle School Council

In this club students  work to promote the interests and ideas of the Middle School at Appleby.  They club examines the many school issues unique to the Middle School. The club organizes and implements fundraisers and activities and helps to plan social events. This club is open to Middle School students and is led by the Middle School prefect with the support of their faculty advisors.

Middle School Service Council

In this club students work to develop and promote an understanding  of service specifically for the Middle School. Members of the council are offered unique positions of leadership while they organize and run service projects both within Appleby and the local community. Open to all Middle School students.

Prefects Council

(Application/Interview) The Prefects Council is for those 15 Senior 2 students chosen as this year's group of Prefects. Prefects foster a culture of inclusivity and caring at Appleby and are the representatives of the student body to the executive leadership at the school.  They meet to plan events and managing the roles.  The also receive extensive leadership development.  These leaders are also role models to the entire community for what type of student we wish to graduate from Appleby College.

Residential Life Council

(Application/Interview) In this club students  work to develop and promote the residential life programme. The Residential Life council is comprised of students who hold leadership positions within the houses as well as the four house prefects. This council develops, plans and implements activities in the Appleby boarding community. They gain the skills and support necessary to be positive leaders amongst their peers within the greater boarding community.

Senior One Leaders

(Application/Interview) In this club students work to support the Middle School homeform programme and to develop leadership skills. Senior Ones accepted into the program will be paired with a Middle One or Middle Two Home Form and will act as mentors and role models for those students. They will receive leadership training, participate in Middle School events and work closely with the Middle School Prefect. Students wishing to apply may do so in the final reporting period of their Upper Two year.

Senior School Council

In this club, senior students  work to promote the interests and ideas of the Senior School at Appleby.  Students plan fundraisers and social events  and discuss school issues.  These senior leaders help to create the culture in the school and role-model for the younger grades.

Service Council*

In this club students work to support the Service Learning programme at Appleby. Programming focuses on understanding the value of community partnerships that enhance the experience of others. Through connections with not-for-profit organizations, the council plans and runs events with a focus on raising awareness, taking action and reflection on impacts. During the weekly meetings, they work on understanding what makes organizations and events successful.

Sustainability Council*

In this club students work to support sustainability at Appleby. They plan campus campaigns and events to raise awareness about the three aspects of sustainability (environmental, social, economic). The council works together with other student organizations to plan events, attend conferences, and organize on-campus student competitions to draw attention to local, national and global sustainability issues. They have partnerships with local groups and organizations and participate in projects that promote sustainability locally.

Upper School Council

In this club students work to promote the interests and ideas of the Upper School at Appleby. This is a group of students led by the Upper School Prefect who wish to have more say in the affairs of Upper One and Upper Two students. Weekly meetings provide a forum for discussions. Students plan fundraisers and social events and discuss academic issues. This club is open to all Upper School students

Wellbeing

Wellbeing clubs provide students an opportunity to engage in lifestyle activities that promote overall mental and physical wellbeing. Student learning is focused on experiential, knowledge and reflection outcomes. Opportunities exist to attend workshops, engage with guest speakers, experience tournaments and to plan and run activities for the larger school community. Many of these groups partner with other student groups, the athletic and residence life communities to provide support and plan activities to ensure that wellbeing is embedded into all program areas of the school.

Chess**

During Chess club, participants face off against one another over the board to play chess weekly. Along with casual games, students may have opportunities to play in tournaments to aid in skill and strategy development.

Dungeons and Dragons Club**

Dungeons and Dragons is a group game that encourages members to take part as leaders and active members of a small team. They play the heroes of their world and look for creative ways to save the world based on their independent strengths and abilities. As students progress through missions they gain self-confidence which can later be applied to their day to day lives.

Meditation Club

The Meditation Club member use silent meditations, guided meditations, focused activities, music, walking meditation to allows students to unwind and relax. The club also works with other student groups to spread this knowledge through leading meditations and mindfulness exercises and opportunities to share in these experiences.

Peer Counselling Club*

(Application/Interview) The Peer Counselling program offers the Appleby community peer support to make decisions, to celebrate experiences, to support others through a challenging period in their lives, and to contribute to a positive community environment. Peer Counsellors meet every week to work towards obtaining their proficiency in the Peer Counselling Training Program. In this time, we develop interpersonal, counselling and leadership skills and work at developing a supportive and positive team environment.

Student Support

Student Support

Student Services Personnel

Student Services Personnel

Appleby College provides its community with a support system that helps students deal with the rigours of an extensive school program and any personal or social issues they may face. Student Services provides a network of personnel and facilities available to all students, parents, faculty and employees.

Assistant Head of School, Community Life - The Assistant Head of School, Community Life, directs all systems in the school community that are geared toward creating a positive, supportive and caring environment. These include Guidance, Advisor, Student Leadership, Health and Wellness, Residential Life, and Spirituality, Ethics and Advocacy programming, as well as facilities such as the Guidance Resource, Health Centre and the Chapel.

Form Advisors - Middle School students have Form Advisors who take primary responsibility for monitoring progress and counselling. Forms meet at the end of the school day, with a Middle School assembly each Wednesday to discuss matters of importance to the entire school. They meet with Middle School teachers on a regular basis to discuss academic and other concerns. Parents are encouraged to contact their child's Form Advisor if they have any questions or issues to discuss.

Advisors - Advisors work with students, their parents, teachers and school directors to encourage, guide and provide support to the advisee in all school endeavours. Upper Ones to Senior Two students are assigned to an Advisor with a group of eight to 10 students also in the same grade. These small advisor groups allow students to transition into a new grade, discuss school issues, seek peer advice and learn from knowledgeable faculty members.

Student Service Facilities and Programs

Student Services Personnel

Appleby College provides its community with a support system that helps students deal with the rigours of an extensive school program and any personal or social issues they may face. Student Services provides a network of personnel and facilities available to all students, parents, faculty and employees.

Assistant Head of School, Community Life - The Assistant Head of School, Community Life, directs all systems in the school community that are geared toward creating a positive, supportive and caring environment. These include Guidance, Advisor, Student Leadership, Health and Wellness, Residential Life, and Spirituality, Ethics and Advocacy programming, as well as facilities such as the Guidance Resource, Health Centre and the Chapel.

Form Advisors - Middle School students have Form Advisors who take primary responsibility for monitoring progress and counselling. Forms meet at the end of the school day, with a Middle School assembly each Wednesday to discuss matters of importance to the entire school. They meet with Middle School teachers on a regular basis to discuss academic and other concerns. Parents are encouraged to contact their child's Form Advisor if they have any questions or issues to discuss.

Advisors - Advisors work with students, their parents, teachers and school directors to encourage, guide and provide support to the advisee in all school endeavours. Upper Ones to Senior Two students are assigned to an Advisor with a group of eight to 10 students also in the same grade. These small advisor groups allow students to transition into a new grade, discuss school issues, seek peer advice and learn from knowledgeable faculty members.

Guidance

Guidance Program

Five counsellors are available to assist students with academic, post-secondary and vocational counselling. All students also take part in a classroom guidance program, taught by the counselling faculty that encompasses learning strategies, career education, communication, decision-making and numerous teen-related issues. The counsellors are available for appointments to discuss academic, career, educational and personal issues. Students also have access to a social worker. The Director of Guidance is responsible for maintaining the Ontario Student Record (OSR).

Educational Counselling

The school has implemented a structured curriculum dealing with careers and education. In Upper One and Two, career exploration is the focus, while Senior One and Two students are involved in an extensive look at post-secondary options, research and the application process. A number of evening presentations are held to keep parents informed and foster their involvement in the process. Students and parents are encouraged to meet individually with counselling staff to deal with their questions and concerns. The school advocates visiting university campuses.

University Entrance Requirements

The chart below provides a simplified guideline indicating the typical course requirements for entrance to common university programs. Requirements for a particular university may differ. Consult a current university calendar for more specific information. View which universities and colleges Appleby graduates have attended in the past five years in the section Where Our Grads Go.

Graduate Studies

A number of fields, such as law, dentistry and medicine, are considered graduate programs, which can be entered upon completion of a bachelor's degree or following a number of years of undergraduate education. Interested students should pursue an appropriate undergraduate program and be prepared for intense competition.

Law - Usually entered following an undergraduate degree. Strong verbal and reading skills are required. LSAT examination also expected.

Medicine - Usually entered following an undergraduate science program, although this may not always be the case. MCAT examinations are expected.

Education - While the majority of students in an education program have completed an undergraduate degree, concurrent programs are offered at a number of universities where the education courses are combined with the undergraduate program of the student. These programs typically take five years to complete.

Personal Counselling - Student Services at Appleby also provides support for students' physical and emotional well-being during challenging stages in life. A curriculum starting in Middle One through Upper Two formally deals with adolescent decision-making and many societal and personal issues faced by today's student, including self-esteem, sexuality, the use of alcohol and other drugs, communication and relationships. Outside the classroom, students have confidential access to a variety of resources through the Guidance Centre, Health Centre, Clinical Resource Team and Chapel. If necessary, an extensive variety of referrals is available.

Peer Counsellors - A formalized peer counselling service is available. It involves a group of trained students who are available to listen and offer support to other students.